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Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Select a Contact Address
After you have some e-mail addresses and names in your Windows Live Contacts list, when composing a message, you can select the address you want directly from Windows Live Contacts instead of typing the address. This is much faster and more accurate than typing the address by hand, particularly if you are sending the message to multiple people.
Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Create a Contact Category
You can organize your contacts into one or more categories, which is useful if you want to view just a subset of your contacts. For example, you could create one category for your work colleagues, another for your family members, a third for people working on a current project, and so on.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 4) - Extending the MDT Database with Custom Settings
In this scenario, you are going to add the name of an application server that differs for each location, so that you can automatically use this name when you configure the custom application during the installation of the workstation.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 3) - Filling the MDT Database Using PowerShell
After you configure the MDT database and define access to it, you can add computers to the database and define their settings. If you need to perform this task for hundreds of computers, you don't want to do it one by one.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 2) - Using the MDT Database
By using the Computers portion of the MDT database, you can uniquely identify computers in your organization. You must provide one of the following items: AssetTag, UUID, Serial Number, or MAC Address.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 1) - Creating the MDT Database
Within MDT 2010, you have the option to create a database that can serve as a centralized repository for the settings that you specify in the CustomSettings.ini file. Instead of putting the settings in the CustomSettings.ini file, you configure the INI file to query the database for the settings to use.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Creating a Linked Deployment Share (part 2) - Maintaining Linked Deployment Shares
DFS-R is the replacement for File Replication Services (FRS) and has been available within Windows Server since 2003 R2. DFS-R features a replication engine that is capable of keeping folders synchronized between servers across connections with limited bandwidth.
Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Creating a Linked Deployment Share (part 1) - Understanding Linked Deployment Shares
By using several linked deployment shares, you can create a scalable deployment solution by placing these linked deployment shares in the neighborhood of the clients you are going to deploy.
Working with the User State Migration Tool (part 5) - Getting Extra Mileage Out of the USMT
You can modify the MigDocs.xml file to exclude any specific types of files based on their extension. You do this by adding an exclude rule to the file. The exclude rule takes the following format.
Working with the User State Migration Tool (part 4) - Applying the Data and Settings Using LoadState
If you've captured the user state data with ScanState, you can restore it with the LoadState command. However, before you can use the LoadState command, you need to ensure it and other required files are accessible on the target computer.
Working with the User State Migration Tool (part 3) - Gathering Data by Running ScanState
The store path is the location where you want the migrated data stored. It can be a network location using a UNC path or an external hard drive accessible to the source computer. You can also specify a path on the local hard drive if desired.
Working with the User State Migration Tool (part 2) - Setting Up the Source Computer
If you plan on running LoadState on a computer, you'll need to copy several files onto the computer first. The source computer can be running Windows XP, Windows Vista, or even Windows 7.
Working with the User State Migration Tool (part 1) - Using the USMT in Four Deployment Scenarios
The bare-metal and upgrade scenarios don't require the use of the USMT. The bare-metal installation installs Windows 7 on a system that doesn't have any operating system on it. This could be a new computer that doesn't have an operating system, or a computer on which you want to remove the existing operating system.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Join a Homegroup
If a homegroup is on your network, you can join your Windows 7 computer to that homegroup. This enables you to access shared resources on other homegroup computers.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Create a Homegroup
You can share documents and media easily with other Windows 7 computers by creating a homegroup on your network. A homegroup simplifies network sharing by making it easy to create a homegroup and share documents, pictures, music, videos, and even printers.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Delete an Account
You can delete a user's account when it is no longer needed. This reduces the number of users in the Manage Accounts window and on the Welcome screen, which makes those screens easier to navigate.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Change a User's Name
If the user name you are using now is not suitable for some reason, you can change it to a different name. If you are running Windows 7 under an administrator account, then you can also change the name of any other user on the system.
Mix and Match with Old Windows and Macs : Internetworking with Macintosh
The Apple Macintosh is arguably the computer of choice in the music, graphic arts, design, and publishing worlds. Apple has even moved to the Intel processor platform, and you can run Windows on a Mac, if you want to. But if you’re a Mac fan, you probably don’t want to.
Mix and Match with Old Windows and Macs : Internetworking with Windows 95, 98, and Me, Internetworking with UNIX and Linux
This section looks at ways to network Windows 7 with UNIX-type OSs. Although many of the examples involve Linux, most of the examples can be translated to almost any UNIX-type OS. And because typing “UNIX-type” is already getting tiresome, from here on, I sometimes write just “UNIX,” but I always mean “UNIX and/or Linux and/or Mac OS X.”
Mix and Match with Old Windows and Macs : Networking with Other Operating Systems, Internetworking with Windows Vista, XP, and 2000
Windows 7’s file and printer sharing services work quite well with Windows Vista, XP, and Windows 2000 Professional. All three OSs were intended from the start to work well with the TCP/IP network protocol favored by Windows 7.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Create a User Account, Switch Between Accounts
After you have created more than one account on your computer, you can switch between accounts. This is useful when one person is already working in Windows 7 and another person needs to use the computer.
Sharing Your Computer with Others : Display User Accounts
If you share your computer with other people, you can run into problems because each person wants his own programs, documents, and settings. To solve these problems, you can create a separate user account for each person.
Plug and Play and Power Management : WMI Request Handler, Synchronization Issues, Security
Because Windows is a pre-emptive, multitasking operating system, multiple threads can try to access shared data structures or resources concurrently and multiple driver routines can run concurrently.
Plug and Play and Power Management : Device Enumeration and Startup (part 2) - Device Power-Down and Removal
The following shows the sequence of callbacks that are involved in power-down and removal for an FDO or filter DO. The sequence starts at the top of the figure with an operational device that is in the working power state (DO).
Plug and Play and Power Management : Device Enumeration and Startup (part 1)
To prepare the device for operation, KMDF calls the driver’s callback routines in a fixed sequence. The sequence varies somewhat depending on the driver’s role in the device stack.
Evaluating Applications for Windows 7 Compatibility : Deploying XP Mode
Sometimes you just can't get an application to work on Windows 7 no matter what you do. You've found no upgrades, there is no vendor or third-party fix, you can't rewrite it, and all your efforts with ACT have failed. You have come to the conclusion that the only thing you can do is run the application on Windows XP.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : The Process of Troubleshooting Startup (part 3) - Troubleshooting Startup Problems After Logon
If your computer fails immediately after a user logs on, use the process illustrated in Figure 9 to identify and disable the failing startup application to allow the user to log on successfully. If the problem occurs immediately after updating or installing an application, try uninstalling that application.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : The Process of Troubleshooting Startup (part 2) - Startup Troubleshooting After the Starting Windows Logo Appears
If your computer displays the graphical Starting Windows logo before failing, as shown in Figure 5, the Windows kernel was successfully loaded. Most likely, the startup failure is caused by a faulty driver or service.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : The Process of Troubleshooting Startup (part 1) - Startup Troubleshooting Before the Starting Windows Logo Appears
Troubleshooting startup problems is more challenging than troubleshooting problems that occur while Windows is running, because you cannot access the full suite of troubleshooting tools included with Windows.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : Important Startup Files, How to Configure Startup Settings
Windows Vista and Windows 7 enable administrators to configure startup settings using many of the same graphical tools that Windows XP provides. Command-line tools for configuring startup tools have been replaced with new tools, however, and you can no longer directly edit the startup configuration file.
Managing Windows 7 : Managing Navigational and Editing Flicks
On a computer that has pen or touch input, you can use flicks to accomplish specific actions. A flick is a short gesture that you make with a pen or a finger, in a specific direction, to accomplish a certain action. You can also customize flicks to perform many different actions.
Managing Windows 7 : Configuring a Pen or Touch Computer, Managing Pen Settings
If you have a Tablet PC or another system that uses pen or touch input, you can configure the computer so that it works best for you and the way you use it. Unless you want to change the way things are working, you'll need to configure most of these settings only once.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : Understanding the Startup Process
To diagnose and correct a startup problem, you need to understand what occurs during startup. Figure 1 provides a high-level overview of the different paths startup can take.
Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : What's New with Windows Startup
Windows 7 includes a few improvements to startup. Most significantly, setup now automatically installs Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE). WinRE, which includes the Startup Repair tool, was available for Windows Vista, but it was not automatically installed. IT professionals could configure the required partition and install the tools to the computer's hard disk, but this was not done by default.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Using Windows 7 with a Netbook
When Microsoft shipped Windows Vista in late 2006, it ushered in an era of next-generation computing that brought with it heady new hardware requirements, rendering certain older PCs immediately obsolete.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Other Mobile Features
In addition to the major new mobility-related features mentioned previously, Windows 7 ships with a host of other technologies that benefit mobile workers. This section highlights some of these features and explains how you can take advantage of them.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Presentations A-Go-Go
An obscure but useful feature, Presentation Settings enables you to temporarily disable your normal power management settings, ensuring that your system stays awake, with no screen dimming, no hard drive disabling, no screen saver activation, and no system notifications to interrupt you.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Windows Mobility Center
In Windows 7, the software giant continued the work it started in Windows Vista toward creating a centralized management console called Windows Mobility Center for all of this functionality, and it has preloaded this dashboard with all of the utilities a mobile user could want. Best of all, PC makers are free to extend Mobility Center with their own machine-specific mobile utilities.
Evaluating Applications for Windows 7 Compatibility : The Application Compatibility Toolkit (part 4) - Resolving Application Compatibility Issues with Shims
Many legacy applications require administrative access to run. This is a problem with most business networks. That's because we like to restrict users to standard users so that we can control security, configuration, and compliance systems. Typical of IT security, we need to find a bottom ground between security and the business operations.
Evaluating Applications for Windows 7 Compatibility : The Application Compatibility Toolkit (part 3) - Using the Application Compatibility Manager
The detail pane illustrates what you need to do to use ACM. You need to create a DCP to collect data for ACM to use. From this, you can analyze the data and generate reports. Then you can use the other ACT tools to test any applications with issues and create shims to make them work on Windows 7.
Evaluating Applications for Windows 7 Compatibility : The Application Compatibility Toolkit (part 2) - Installing ACT
You'll need to figure out which SQL license to use. A single-machine deployment of ACT that uses the ACT tools only locally can use the free SQL Express 2008. Any project requiring databases more than 4 GB in size or use of the ACT tools on many machines will need a purchased edition of SQL.
Evaluating Applications for Windows 7 Compatibility : The Application Compatibility Toolkit (part 1) - Choosing an ACT Architecture
To plan for ACT, you will need to understand how it works. There are two basic ways to use ACT. It contains a number of tools for creating shims to mitigate application compatibility issues. A simple, quick installation of ACT allows you to do that.
Using COM to Develop UMDF Drivers : Basic Infrastructure Implementation
A UMDF driver consists of a collection of COM callback objects. These objects respond to notification by the UMDF run time and allow the driver to process various events, such as read or write requests. All callback objects are in-process COM objects.
Using COM to Develop UMDF Drivers : Using UMDF COM Objects
A process that uses a COM object is known as a COM client. Both UMDF drivers and the UMDF run-time function as COM clients. UMDF drivers interact with UMDF run time by using UMDF-provided COM objects.
Using COM to Develop UMDF Drivers : Getting Started - COM Fundamentals, HRESULT
In general, the UMDF drivers are programmed using C++, and the COM objects are developed and also written in C++. It is good to have an understanding of class structure such as the struct and class keywords, public and private members, static methods, constructors, destructors, and pure abstract classes.
Repairing and Removing Programs : Removing Programs, Returning to a Previous Version, Turning Windows Features On and Off
Only turn off program features that you know and are certain you don't need. If you don't know what a feature is or does, better to err in favor of keeping it active than to find out, the hard way, that you shouldn't have disabled it!
Repairing and Removing Programs : Changing and Repairing Programs
Some large programs let you choose how you want to install the program. For example, you may be given options to do a Minimum Install, Typical Install, or Complete Install. You might do a Minimum or Typical installation to conserve disk space, but later discover you need a feature that only the Complete install would have provided.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Power Management (part 2) - Power Options Control Panel
Windows 7's power options are, go figure, configured via the Power Options control panel, which is available in Control Panel => Hardware and Sound => Power Options on any kind of PC.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Power Management (part 1) - Battery Meter, Power Plans
Microsoft has further simplified the power plans in Windows 7, compared even to the work that began with Windows Vista. These power plans are used to manage your PC's use of its power resources, both while attached to wall power and while running on battery.
Windows 7 Mobility Features : Working with the Windows 7 User Interface
One of the most obvious niceties of Windows 7 is the Windows Aero user interface. Windows Aero offers several unique features compared to the other UI options available in Windows 7, including translucency, various special effects, and even access to certain Windows features.
 
 
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