Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Azure

The basics of BLOBs - Configuring your application to work against the live service

3/4/2011 11:40:22 AM
- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
To switch your application from the development storage to the live storage account, you need to create a live storage account and switch your configuration to it. In this section, we won’t go through the process of creating a storage account; it’s pretty simple and the information you require is available in this chapter. We’re going to focus on configuring your application to work against your live storage account.

1. Switching to the live storage account

To make your application work against the live system, all you need to do is modify the value of your configuration setting in the service configuration file. That’s it, the end, nothing else to do. If you remember earlier, you set your storage account configuration setting to the following:

<Setting name="DataConnectionString"
value="UseDevelopmentStorage=true" />

Although this is great for the development storage, it doesn’t give you a clue to the structure of the setting for when you want to use the live system. The following setting shows how the string should be structured.

<Setting name="DataConnectionString"
value="DefaultEndpointsProtocol=protocol;
AccountName=storageaccountname;
AccountKey=storageaccountkey" />

To make this run against the live system, plug in the appropriate values:

<Setting name="DataConnectionString"
value="DefaultEndpointsProtocol=http;
AccountName=silverlightukstorage;
AccountKey=Eby8vdM02xNOcqFlqUwJPLlmEtlCDXJ1OUzFT50uSRZ6IFsuFq2UVErCz4I6tq/K1SZFPTOtr/KBHBeksoGMGw==
" />


Now that you’ve configured the live settings, you can use the live BLOB storage system either from the development fabric or from the live production fabric. The only thing left to do is to configure the access key.

2. Configuring the access key

If you’re unsure where you get the account key for the storage account, you can always refer to the Azure portal. When a new storage account is created in Windows Azure, a primary and secondary access key is generated for you to secure your API requests. The access key for your live account is used by all storage services and is available from the storage account section of the portal. Figure 1 shows the window in which you can retrieve your access key. When you retrieve this key, it replaces the development key held in the service configuration file.

Figure 1. Access key in the Azure portal


If your access key is compromised at any point, you can generate a new key by clicking the Regenerate button shown in figure 8.12. After a new key has been generated, you’ll need to update the key in the service configuration for your application. You also have two keys that are valid at one point in time. Both keys are identical in what they allow the user to do with them. Having two keys is a great way to provide rolling key updates without any downtime in your system.

Other -----------------
- The basics of BLOBs : Developing against containers (part 3) - Listing containers & Deleting a container
- The basics of BLOBs : Developing against containers (part 2) - Creating a container
- The basics of BLOBs : Developing against containers (part 1) - Accessing the StorageClient library & Accessing development storage
- The basics of BLOBs : Getting started with development storage
- A closer look at the BLOB storage service
- Storing files in a scaled-out fashion is a pain in the NAS (part 2) - The BLOB service approach to file management
- Storing files in a scaled-out fashion is a pain in the NAS (part 1) - Traditional approaches to BLOB management
 
 
25 Inspiring Game of Thrones Quotes
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
programming4us
Natural Miscarriage
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer