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Programming the WshShell Object : Displaying Information to the User

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3/4/2011 5:39:59 PM

Referencing the WshShell Object

WshShell refers to the Shell object exposed via the Automation interface of WScript. Therefore, you must use CreateObject to return this object:

Set objWshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")

From here, you can use the objWshShell variable to access the object’s properties and methods.

Displaying Information to the User

You saw earlier that the WScript object’s Echo method is useful for displaying simple text messages to the user. You can gain more control over the displayed message by using the WshShell object’s Popup method. This method is similar to the MsgBox function used in Visual Basic and VBA in that it enables you to control both the dialog box title and the buttons displayed, as well as to determine which of those buttons the user pressed. Here’s the syntax:

WshShell.Popup(strText, [nSecondsToWait], [strTitle], [intType])

WshShellThe WshShell object.
strTextThe message you want to display in the dialog box. You can enter a string up to 1,024 characters long.
nSecondsToWaitThe maximum number of seconds the dialog box will be displayed.
strTitleThe text that appears in the dialog box title bar. If you omit this value, Windows Script Host appears in the title bar.
intTypeA number or constant that specifies, among other things, the command buttons that appear in the dialog box (see the next section). The default value is 0.

For example, the following statements display the dialog box shown in Figure 1:

Set objWshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
objWshShell.Popup "Couldn't find Memo.doc!", , "Warning"

Figure 1. A simple message dialog box produced by the Popup method.


Tip

For long messages, VBScript wraps the text inside the dialog box. If you prefer to create your own line breaks, use VBScript’s Chr function and the carriage return character (ASCII 13) between each line:

WshShell.Popup "First line" & Chr(13) & "Second line"

For JavaScript, use \n instead:

WshShell.Popup("First line" + "\n" + "Second line");


Setting the Style of the Message

The default Popup dialog box displays only an OK button. You can include other buttons and icons in the dialog box by using different values for the intTypeTable 1 lists the available options. parameter.

Table 1. The Popup Method’s intType Parameter Options
VBScript ConstantValueDescription
Buttons  
vbOKOnly0Displays only an OK button. This is the default.
vbOKCancel1Displays the OK and Cancel buttons.
vbAbortRetryIgnore2Displays the Abort, Retry, and Ignore buttons.
vbYesNoCancel3Displays the Yes, No, and Cancel buttons.
vbYesNo4Displays the Yes and No buttons.
vbRetryCancel5Displays the Retry and Cancel buttons.
Icons  
vbCritical16Displays the Critical Message icon.
vbQuestion32Displays the Warning Query icon.
vbExclamation48Displays the Warning Message icon.
vbInformation64Displays the Information Message icon.
Default Buttons  
vbDefaultButton10The first button is the default (that is, the button selected when the user presses Enter).
vbDefaultButton2256The second button is the default.
vbDefaultButton3512The third button is the default.

You derive the intType argument in one of two ways:

  • By adding the values for each option

  • By using the VBScript constants separated by plus signs (+)

The script in Listing 1 shows an example and Figure 2 shows the resulting dialog box.

Listing 1. A VBScript Example That Uses the Popup Method to Display the Dialog Box Shown in Figure 2
' First, set up the message
'
strText = "Are you sure you want to copy" & Chr(13)
strText = strText & "the selected files to drive A?"
strTitle = "Copy Files"
intType = vbYesNoCancel + vbQuestion + vbDefaultButton2
'
' Now display it
'
Set objWshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
intResult = objWshShell.Popup(strText, ,strTitle, intType)

Figure 2. The dialog box that’s displayed when you run the script.


Here, three variables—strText, strTitle, and intType—store the values for the Popup method’s strText, strTitle, and intType arguments, respectively. In particular, the following statement derives the intType argument:

intType = vbYesNoCancel + vbQuestion + vbDefaultButton2

You also could derive the intType argument by adding up the values that these constants represent (3, 32, and 256, respectively), but the script becomes less readable that way.

Getting Return Values from the Message Dialog Box

A dialog box that displays only an OK button is straightforward. The user either clicks OK or presses Enter to remove the dialog from the screen. The multibutton styles are a little different, however; the user has a choice of buttons to select, and your script should have a way to find out which button the user chose, which enables it to decide what to do next, based on the user’s selection. You do this by storing the Popup method’s return value in a variable. Table 2 lists the seven possible return values.

Table 2. The Popup Method’s Return Values
VBScript ConstantValueButton Selected
vbOK1OK
vbCancel2Cancel
vbAbort3Abort
vbRetry4Retry
vbIgnore5Ignore
vbYes6Yes
vbNo7No

To process the return value, you can use an If...Then...Else or Select Case structure to test for the appropriate values. For example, the script shown earlier used a variable called intResult to store the return value of the Popup method. Listing 2 shows a revised version of the script that uses a VBScript Select Case statement to test for the three possible return values.

Listing 2. A Script That Uses a Select Case Statement to Process the Popup Method’s Return Value
' First, set up the message
'
strText = "Are you sure you want to copy" & Chr(13)
strText = strText & "the selected files to drive A?"
strTitle = "Copy Files"
intType = vbYesNoCancel + vbQuestion + vbDefaultButton2
'
' Now display it
'
Set objWshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
intResult = objWshShell.Popup(strText, ,strTitle, intType)
'
' Process the result
'
Select Case intResult
Case vbYes
WScript.Echo "You clicked ""Yes""!"
Case vbNo
WScript.Echo "You clicked ""No""!"
Case vbCancel
WScript.Echo "You clicked ""Cancel""!"
End Select
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