Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Server

Working with the Windows Home Server Registry : Finding Registry Entries

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
1/11/2013 3:34:59 PM

The Registry contains only five root keys, but they contain hundreds of subkeys. The fact that some root keys are aliases for subkeys in a different branch only adds to the confusion. If you know exactly where you’re going, the Registry Editor’s treelike hierarchy is a reasonable way to get there. If you’re not sure where a particular subkey or setting resides, however, you could spend all day poking around in the Registry’s labyrinthine nooks and crannies.

To help you get where you want to go, the Registry Editor has a Find feature that enables you to search for keys, settings, or values. Here’s how it works:

1.
In the Keys pane, select Computer at the top of the pane (unless you’re certain of which root key contains the value you want to find; in this case, you can highlight the appropriate root key instead).

2.
Select Edit, Find or press Ctrl+F. The Registry Editor displays the Find dialog box, shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Use the Find dialog box to search for Registry keys, settings, or values.


3.
Use the Find What text box to enter your search string. You can enter partial words or phrases to increase your chances of finding a match.

4.
In the Look At group, activate the check boxes for the elements you want to search. For most searches, you want to leave all three check boxes activated.

5.
If you want to find only those entries that exactly match your search text, activate the Match Whole String Only check box.

6.
Click the Find Next button. The Registry Editor highlights the first match.

7.
If this isn’t the item you want, select Edit, Find Next (or press F3) until you find the setting or key you want.

When the Registry Editor finds a match, it displays the appropriate key or setting. Note that if the matched value is a setting name or data value, Find doesn’t highlight the current key. This is a bit confusing, but remember that the current key always appears at the bottom of the Keys pane.

Other -----------------
- Working with the Windows Home Server Registry : Working with Registry Entries - Changing the Value of a Registry Entry
- SharePoint 2010 : Packaging and Deployment Model - Site Definitions
- SharePoint 2010 : Packaging and Deployment Model - Features (part 3) - Upgrading Features
- SharePoint 2010 : Packaging and Deployment Model - Features (part 2) - Feature Receivers
- SharePoint 2010 : Packaging and Deployment Model - Features (part 1) - Feature Designer
- SharePoint 2010 : Packaging and Deployment Model - Working with Packages
- Microsoft Content Management Server Development : Validating the HtmlPlaceholderControl (part 3) - Building the Required HTML Placeholder Validator
- Microsoft Content Management Server Development : Validating the HtmlPlaceholderControl (part 2) - Checking for an Empty HtmlPlaceholderControl
- Microsoft Content Management Server Development : Validating the HtmlPlaceholderControl (part 1) - Retrieving the Current Value of the HtmlPlaceholderControl
- Windows Server 2003 on HP ProLiant Servers : Migration Case Studies (part 3) - Hewlett-Packard Company
 
 
25 Inspiring Game of Thrones Quotes
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
programming4us
Natural Miscarriage
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer