Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Vista

Windows Firewall: Bidirectional Protection

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
3/20/2011 10:51:09 PM
If you access the Internet using a broadband—cable modem or DSL—service, chances are, you have an always-on connection, which means there’s a much greater chance that a malicious hacker could find your computer and have his way with it. You might think that with millions of people connected to the Internet at any given moment, there would be little chance of a “script kiddy” finding you in the herd. Unfortunately, one of the most common weapons in a black-hat hacker’s arsenal is a program that runs through millions of IP addresses automatically, looking for live connections. The fact that many cable systems and some DSL systems use IP addresses in a narrow range compounds the problem by making it easier to find always-on connections.

When a cracker finds your address, he has many avenues from which to access your computer. Specifically, your connection uses many different ports for sending and receiving data. For example, the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) uses ports 20 and 21, web data and commands typically use port 80, email uses ports 25 and 110, the domain name system (DNS) uses port 53, and so on. In all, there are dozens of these ports, and every one is an opening through which a clever cracker can gain access to your computer.

As if that weren’t enough, attackers can check your system for the installation of some kind of Trojan horse or virus. (Malicious email attachments sometimes install these programs on your machine.) If the hacker finds one, he can effectively take control of your machine (turning it into a zombie computer) and either wreak havoc on its contents or use your computer to attack other systems.

Again, if you think your computer is too obscure or worthless for someone else to bother with, think again. Hackers probe a typical computer connected to the Internet all day long for vulnerable ports or installed Trojan horses at least a few times every day. If you want to see just how vulnerable your computer is, several good sites on the Web will test your security:

The good news is that Windows Vista includes an updated version of the Windows Firewall tool that debuted in Windows XP. This program is a personal firewall that can lock down your ports and prevent unauthorized access to your machine. In effect, your computer becomes invisible to the Internet (although you can still surf the Web and work with email normally).

The main change in Vista’s version of Windows Firewall is that the program is now bidirectional. This means that it blocks not only unauthorized incoming traffic, but also unauthorized outgoing traffic. If your computer has a Trojan horse installed (it might have been there before you installed Vista, or someone with physical access to your computer might have installed it), it might attempt to send data out to the Web. For example, it might attempt to contact a controlling program on another site to get instructions, or it might attempt to send sensitive data from your computer to the Trojan’s owner. A bidirectional firewall can put a stop to that.

The Windows Firewall in Vista also supports the following new features:

  • The IP Security (IPSec) protocol

  • Environments that use only Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)

  • Both incoming and outgoing firewall exceptions

  • Exceptions applied to specific computers and users

  • Exceptions applied to many different protocols (not just TCP and UDP)

  • Exceptions applied to both local and remote ports

  • Exceptions applied to specific interface types: location area network, remote access, or wireless

  • Exceptions applied to specific Vista services

  • Command-line support for controlling the firewall

From this list, you can see that Vista’s firewall is a far more sophisticated tool than any of the versions that shipped with XP or its service packs. A powerful new interface for working with Windows Firewall settings, exceptions, and monitoring reflects that sophistication. It’s Windows Firewall with Advanced Security (WFAS), and it’s a Microsoft Management Console snap-in. To load it, press Windows Logo+R, type wf.msc, click OK, and then enter your User Account Control credentials. Figure 1 shows the WFAS snap-in.

Figure 1. The new Windows Firewall with Advanced Security snap-in offers sophisticated firewall-management features.

The home page of the snap-in presents an overview of the current firewall settings, as well as a number of links to configure and learn about WFAS. This snap-in configures the firewall by setting policies and storing them in three profiles. The domain profile is used when your computer is connected to a network domain; the private profile is used when your computer is connected to a private network; and the public profile is used when your computer is connected to a public network. To change the settings for the profiles, click the Windows Firewall Properties link, and then use the Domain Profile, Private Profile, and Public Profile tabs to modify the settings (although the defaults should be fine for most people).

The scope pane contains four main sub-branches:

  • Inbound Rules— This branch presents a list of defined rules for inbound connections. In most cases, the rules aren’t enabled. To enable a rule, you right-click it and then click Enable Rule (or you can click the rule and then click Enable Rule in the Action pane). You can create your own rule by right-clicking Inbound Rules and then clicking New Rule (or clicking New Rule in the Action pane). This launches the New Inbound Rule Wizard.

  • Outbound Rules— This branch presents a list of defined rules for outbound connections. As with inbound connections, you can enable the rules you want to use and create your own rules. Note, too, that you can customize any rule by double-clicking it to display its properties sheet (see Figure 2). With this properties sheet, you can change the program executable to which the exception is applied, allow or block a connection, set the computer and user authorization, change the ports and protocols, and specify the interface types and services.

    Figure 2. Use an exception’s properties sheet to customize all aspects of the exception.

  • Connection Security Rules— This branch is where you create and manage authentication rules, which determine the restrictions and requirements that apply to connections with remote computers. Right-click Computer Connection Security and then click New Rule (or click New Rule in the Action pane) to launch the New Connection Security Rule Wizard.

  • Monitoring— This branch shows the enabled firewall settings. For example, the Firewall sub-branch shows the enabled inbound and outbound firewall rules, and the Connection Security, Rules sub-branch shows the enabled authentication rules.

Other -----------------
- Example: Scripting Internet Explorer
- Programming the WshNetwork Object
- Supporting Desktop Applications : Repair a Corrupted Operating System (part 4)
- Supporting Desktop Applications : Repair a Corrupted Operating System (part 3) - Complete PC Backup and Restore
- Supporting Desktop Applications : Repair a Corrupted Operating System (part 2) - System Restore
- Supporting Desktop Applications : Repair a Corrupted Operating System (part 1)
- Maintain Desktop Applications (part 2) - Using Group Policy to Manage Application Compatibility
- Maintain Desktop Applications (part 1) - New Program Compatibility Wizard
- Supporting Desktop Applications : Troubleshoot Software Restrictions
- Support Deployed Applications
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
programming4us
Natural Miscarriage
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer