Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows XP

Installing and Configuring a Modem : Working with Different Dialing Locations

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019
3/21/2011 6:31:32 PM
If you have a notebook computer, you can set up multiple dialing locations. For example, you could have one location for dialing from the office that uses extra digits to access an outside line and uses your corporate calling card. You could then have a second location for home that doesn’t require anything extra to access an outside line and disables your call waiting service.

Caution

If you travel with your notebook and use a modem to connect to the office or the Internet, watch out for the digital phone systems that are used by many hotels. Analog modems aren’t compatible with digital systems, so you end up frying your modem if you attempt to connect over a digital line. Unfortunately, digital phone jacks look identical to regular analog jacks, so you need to ask the hotel staff what kind of phone jacks the hotel uses. Note, however, that almost all hotel phones now come with a data jack, and it’s perfectly safe to plug your modem into that jack. Just avoid plugging the modem into any wall jacks.


Creating a New Dialing Location

The location information you entered while installing Windows XP (if Setup detected your modem) or while installing your first modem is stored in a location called My Location. To set up another location, follow these steps:

1.
Double-click Control Panel’s Phone and Modem Options icon. The Phone and Modem Options dialog box appears.

2.
Display the Dialing Rules tab.

3.
Click New to display the New Location dialog box.

4.
Type a name in the Location Name text box.

5.
Configure the location as described in the next section.

Modifying Dialing Location Properties

Windows XP keeps track of various dialing properties that you can apply before connecting with your modem. These properties determine how Windows XP dials the modem. For example, the Country setting determines the country code used for long-distance calls (this is 1 in the United States and Canada), and the Area Code setting lets Windows XP determine whether the outgoing call is long distance.

You can change these and other dialing parameters by following these steps:

1.
Double-click Control Panel’s Phone and Modem Options icon. The Phone and Modem Options dialog box appears.

2.
Display the Dialing Rules tab.

3.
In the Locations list, select the location you want to work with.

4.
Click Edit to display the Edit Location dialog box, shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Use this dialog box to adjust the settings that Windows XP uses to dial your modem.


5.
Configure the location using the following controls:

Country/RegionUse this list to set the country code from which you’ll be dialing.
Area CodeUse this text box to set the area code from which you’ll be dialing.
To Access an Outside Line for Local Calls, DialUse this text box to enter the code that must be dialed to get an outside line for local calls (such as 9).
To Access an Outside Line for Long-Distance Calls, DialUse this text box to enter the code that must be dialed to get an outside line for long distance calls (such as 8).
Use this Carrier Code to Make Long-Distance CallsUse this text box to enter the code required by your long-distance carrier for long-distance calls.
Use this Carrier Code to Make International CallsUse this text box to enter the code required by your long-distance carrier for international calls.
To Disable Call Waiting, DialTo deactivate call waiting before making the call, activate this check box and then either type the appropriate code in the text box or select one of the existing codes from the list.

Caution

The extra beeps that call waiting uses to indicate an incoming call can wreak havoc on modem communications, so you should always disable call waiting before initiating a data call. The sequences *70, 70#, and 1170 usually disable call waiting, but you should check with your local phone company to make sure.

Dial UsingActivate either Tone or Pulse, as appropriate for your telephone line.

Specifying an Area Code Rule

Area codes are getting increasingly confusing. There are two situations that are causing the weirdness:

  • Calling the same area code— In this situation, you don’t usually have to bother with the area code. However, some phone systems insist that you include the area code even if the other number is in the same area code. In some cases, these are long-distance calls, so you even have to dial a 1 (or some other country or region code) to start the call.

  • Calling a different area code— This situation normally requires that you dial a 1 (or whatever), followed by the area code, followed by the number. However, in some larger cities, the phone company has actually run out of numbers in the main area code, so they’ve created a whole new area code for the city. These aren’t usually long-distance calls, however, so even though you have to include the area code, you don’t usually have to dial a 1 to get started.

Note that in both cases, the area code might apply to only certain phone number prefixes. (The prefix is the first three digits of the seven-digit number.) If you have to make any calls in these situations, you need to define a new area code rule to handle it. Here’s how it’s done:

1.
Double-click Control Panel’s Phone and Modem Options icon. The Phone and Modem Options dialog box appears.

2.
Display the Dialing Rules tab.

3.
In the Locations list, select the location you want to work with.

4.
Click Edit to display the Edit Location dialog box.

5.
Display the Area Code Rules tab.

6.
Click New to display the New Area Code Rule dialog box, shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Use the New Area Code Rule dialog box to add an area code rule to a dialing location.


7.
Use the Area Code text box to type the area code you’ll be calling.

8.
If the rule will apply only to certain phone number prefixes, activate the Include Only the Prefixes in the List Below option. Then click Add, type the prefix (or prefixes, separated by spaces or commas), and click OK.

9.
If you need to dial a country code (such as 1) before the area code, activate the Dial check box and use the text box to type the number.

10.
To force Windows XP to dial this area code, activate the Include the Area Code check box.

11.
Click OK.

Specifying a Calling Card

When you’re on the road, you’ll often find yourself having to make calls that cost money. For example, if you’re in a hotel that charges for calls, you might want the charge to go through your calling card.

For this type of situation, Windows XP enables you to specify a calling card to use when making the call. Here’s the simplest route to take:

1.
Double-click Control Panel’s Phone and Modem Options icon. The Phone and Modem Options dialog box appears.

2.
Display the Dialing Rules tab.

3.
In the Locations list, select the location you want to work with.

4.
Click Edit to display the Edit Location dialog box.

5.
Display the Calling Card tab.

6.
In the Card Types list, select the type of calling card you have.

7.
Type your account number.

8.
Type your personal ID number (PIN).

9.
Click OK.

If your calling card isn’t in the list, click New to get to the New Calling Card dialog box. Alternatively, if your card is listed, you might need to adjust its settings. In that case, select the card and then click Edit to get the Edit Calling Card dialog box (which is identical to the New Calling Card dialog box). This dialog box has four tabs, so let’s see what each one holds.

The General tab is as good a place as any to start. Here you need to enter three things: the calling card name (this will appear in the Card Types list), your account number, and your PIN.

You use the Long Distance tab to specify the steps that must be followed to make a long distance call. The first thing to do is specify your card’s access number for long-distance calls. After that’s done, you define the steps by clicking the buttons below the Calling Card Dialing Steps box. There are six buttons for your clicking finger to tickle:

Access NumberClick this button to add the long-distance access number to the steps.
PINClick this button to add your PIN to the steps.
Wait for PromptClick this button to display a dialog box with various things that the system must wait for before continuing the dialing. You can have the system wait for a dial tone, a completed voice message, or a specified number of seconds.
Account NumberClick this button to add your account number to the steps.
Destination NumberClick this button to add the number you’re calling to the steps. You also get a dialog box in which you can tell Windows XP to also dial the country code and area code.
Specify DigitsClick this button to add one or more digits (as well as * and ) to the steps.

The idea is that you click these buttons in the order that they must appear in the card’s calling sequence. If you make a mistake, use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to shuffle things around. If your card requires different sequences for international and local calls, follow the same steps using the International and Local Calls tabs. When you’re done, click OK to return to the New Location dialog box. Then click OK to return to the Phone and Modem Options dialog box.

Other -----------------
- Installing and Configuring a Modem : Installing a Modem & Testing the Modem
- Getting Started with Modem Communications : Modem-to-Modem Communications
- Tuning Windows XP’s Performance : More Optimization Tricks
- Tuning Windows XP’s Performance : Optimizing Virtual Memory
- Tuning Windows XP’s Performance : Optimizing Applications
- Tuning Windows XP’s Performance : Optimizing Startup
- Monitoring Performance with System Monitor
- Monitoring Performance with Task Manager
- Administering Your Network - Broadcasting Console Messages
- Administering Your Network - Managing a Remote Computer
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server