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Monitoring Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Using Windows SBS Console Monitoring (part 3) - Creating and Viewing Reports

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1/24/2013 6:20:38 PM

3. Creating and Viewing Reports

Another way to monitor Windows SBS network activity is to create reports. When you click Reports in the Windows SBS Console, you see the interface shown in Figure 4, which displays the two reports that Windows SBS 2011 creates by default.

The Reports page in the Windows SBS Console.

Figure 4. The Reports page in the Windows SBS Console.

The reports that the Windows SBS Console generates are expanded versions of the Network essentials summary that appears on the console’s Home page, captured at a specific time. By default, Windows SBS runs a Summary network report each day at 3:15 A.M. and a Detailed network report each Sunday at 3:45 A.M., and emails them both to the Windows SBS Administrators distribution group. You can modify the schedule for these reports as needed, as well as their contents and their recipients. You can also create your own reports.

The Summary network report, as shown in Figure 5, displays the status of six system areas, which include the same Security, Updates, Backup, and Other alerts areas as the Network essentials summary; plus two more: E-mail usage and mailbox sizes and Server event logs. For each area that has an Error status, the report includes a one-line summary of the basic problem. In nearly all cases, the summary report can indicate that a problem exists, but administrators must consult other server resources to determine the source and nature of the problem.

A Summary Network Report generated by Windows SBS 2011.

Figure 5. A Summary Network Report generated by Windows SBS 2011.

The Detailed Network Report, as shown in Figure 6, covers the same six areas, but provides more information for each one, regardless of its status. The detailed report includes statistics, policy settings, and key error messages that can often provide administrators with enough information to diagnose a problem without having to consult other resources.

A Detailed Network Report generated by Windows SBS 2011.

Figure 6. A Detailed Network Report generated by Windows SBS 2011.

Caution

Remember that both of these reports reflect the condition of the network at the time that the system generated them. By the time you read the reports, some conditions might have changed.

Modifying the Default Reports

The Detailed Network Report begins with a Summary section that is identical to the Summary Network Report, followed by a Details section. Because the system does not take very long to generate either report, you might want to consider modifying the default schedules to generate the detailed report every day instead of once per week.

To modify the schedule of the Detailed Network Report, perform the following:

  1. Log on to your Windows SBS 2011 primary server, using an account with network Administrator privileges. The Windows SBS Console appears.

  2. Click Reports.

  3. Select Detailed network report and, from the Tasks list, click View report properties. The Detailed Network Report Properties sheet appears.

    image with no caption
  4. Click the Schedule tab.

    image with no caption
  5. From the Recurrence drop-down list, select Daily. From the Time drop-down list, select a different time for the report to run, if desired.

  6. Click OK.

Creating New Reports

In addition to modifying the default reports, you can create new reports that contain information on specific areas and run at specified times, which the system supplies to specific users via email. To create a new report, follow this procedure:

  1. Log on to your Windows SBS 2011 primary server, using an account with network Administrator privileges. The Windows SBS Console appears.

  2. Click Reports.

  3. From the Tasks list, select Add a new report. The New Report Properties sheet appears.

    image with no caption
  4. In the Report name text box, type the name you want to assign to the report. Then click the Content tab.

    image with no caption
  5. Select the check boxes for the areas that you want to include in the report and click the E-Mail options tab.

    image with no caption
  6. Select the E-Mail this report at its scheduled time check box and select the check boxes for the internal users or groups that you want to receive the report. You can also type other email addresses in the Other e-mail addresses (separated by a semi-colon) text box, if desired. Then, click the Schedule tab.

    image with no caption
  7. In the Recurrence drop-down list, specify whether you want the system to run the report daily or weekly. From the Time drop-down list, select the time of day that you want the system to generate the report. If you chose the Weekly option, select a value in the Day of the week drop-down list.

  8. Click OK. The new report appears on the Reports page.

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