Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Vista

Accessing and Using Your Network : Sharing Resources with the Network (part 1) - Setting Up File and Printer Sharing, Deactivating the Sharing Wizard

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
7/26/2013 5:58:44 PM

In a peer-to-peer network, each computer can act as both a client and a server. You’ve seen how to use a Windows Vista machine as a client, so now let’s turn our attention to setting up your system as a peer server. In Windows Vista, that means sharing individual drives, folders, printers and other resources with the network.

1. Setting Up File and Printer Sharing

Whether it’s a folder, disk drive, or printer, networking is all about sharing. Vista’s sharing options have many more nuances than those of previous versions of Windows. In fact, Vista allows you to configure sharing in five different ways: general file and printer sharing, Public folder sharing, printer sharing, password-protected sharing, and media sharing. It all happens in the Network and Sharing Center , in the Sharing and Discovery section.

The File Sharing setting covers general file and printer sharing. It offers you two choices (after making your choice, click Apply and enter your UAC credentials):

Turn On File Sharing— Activate this option to allow other people on the network to access your shared files and printer.

Turn Off File Sharing— Activate this option to prevent other people on the network from accessing your shared files and printers. Note that turning off this setting also turns off the Public Folder Sharing and Printer Sharing settings.

The Public Folder Sharing setting covers sharing the Public folder, and gives you three choices (after making your choice, click Apply and enter your UAC credentials):

Turn On Sharing So Anyone with Network Access Can Open Files— Activate this option to share the Public folder, but allow network users only to read files in that folder (that is, users can’t create new files or change existing files).

Turn On Sharing So Anyone with Network Access Can Open, Change, and Create Files— Activate this option to share the Public folder, and allow network users to read, edit, and create new files in that folder.

Turn Off Sharing (People Logged On to this Computer Can Still Access This Folder)— Activate this option to prevent sharing the Public folder with network users (although you can still share the folder with other accounts on your computer).

The Printer Sharing setting covers sharing the Printers folder, and offers you two choices (after making your choice, click Apply and enter your UAC credentials):

Turn On Printer Sharing— Activate this option to allow other people on the network to access your Printers folder.

Turn Off Printer Sharing— Activate this option to prevent other people on the network from accessing your Printers folder.

The Password Protected Sharing setting covers sharing with password protection. You have two choices (after making your choice, click Apply and enter your UAC credentials):

Turn On Password Protected Sharing— Activate this option to share resources only with people who know the username and password of an account on your computer.

Turn Off Password Protected Sharing— Activate this option to allow any network user to access your shared resources.

The Media Sharing setting connects with Media Player’s library sharing features. 

Finally, you also have two links for viewing shared files and folders:

Show Me All the Files and Folders I Am Sharing— Click this link to open the Shared By Me search folder.

Show Me All the Shared Network Folders on This Computer— Click this link to open a folder window showing your computer’s shared folders and printers.

2. Deactivating the Sharing Wizard

Sharing can be a complex business when you get into file permissions and other minutiae. So sharing holds no terrors for the likes of you and me. However, novice users want sharing to be simple and straightforward, and to that end Vista introduces the Sharing Wizard. This wizard presents the wary with a stripped-down set of sharing options and a method for letting other people know that a shared resource is available.

The Sharing Wizard activates by default, and in a second I’ll show you how to deactivate it. Just so that you know what you’re giving up, Figure 1 shows the initial wizard dialog box. You use the list to select a user account on your computer, and then you assign that user one of three permission levels: Reader (read-only), Contributor (read and write), or Co-owner (all permissions). When you click Share (and then enter your UAC credentials), the Sharing Wizard shows the address of the share and offers a link to email the share address to other people.

Figure 1. The Sharing Wizard offers a simple, novice-oriented interface for sharing resources.

The Sharing Wizard is actually a bit of an improvement over the brain-dead Simple File Sharing feature in Windows XP, but it’s still suitable for new users. However, the rest of us want the full power of permissions and other sharing goodies. To get at them, you have to deactivate the Sharing Wizard feature by following these steps:

1.
Select Start, Control Panel, Appearance and Personalization, Folder Options icon (or, in any folder window, select Organize, Folder and Search Options).

2.
Display the View tab.

3.
Deactivate the Use Sharing Wizard check box.

4.
Click OK.

Caution

To use Vista’s advanced sharing features, you need to supply User Account Control credentials.


3. Creating User Accounts for Sharing

If you activated the Password Protected Sharing option, you have to do one of the following:

  • Set up separate accounts for each user that you want to access a shared resource— Do this if you want to assign each user a different set of permissions, or if you want the usernames and passwords to match each user’s local username and password.

  • Set up a single account for all remote users to use— Do this if you want to assign the same set of permissions for all users.

Here are some notes to bear in mind for creating users who will access your computer over a network:

  • Windows Vista does not allow users without passwords to access network resources. Therefore, you must set up your network user accounts with passwords.

  • The usernames you create do not have to correspond with the names that users have on their local machines. You’re free to set up your own usernames, if you like.

  • If you create a user account that has the same name and password as an account of a user on his or her local machine, that user will be able to access your shared resources directly. Otherwise, a Connect To dialog box appears so that the user can enter the username and password that you established when setting up the account on your computer.

Other -----------------
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Accessing Network Resources
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Learning Some Common Network Tasks
- Collecting Vista Events
- Automating Vista Events
- Exploring the Vista Task Scheduler
- Tracking Change in Vista : Turning on the audit policy, Exploring the Vista Event Log
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 4) - Assigning PC-Related GPOs, Troubleshooting and monitoring Group Policy
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 3) - Working with GPO tools
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 2) - Working with central policies
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 1) - Working with Local Policies
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server