Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Vista

Accessing and Using Your Network : Sharing Resources with the Network (part 3) - Hiding Shared Resources

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
7/26/2013 6:01:00 PM

5. Hiding Shared Resources

Hiding your valuables is a time-tested method of securing them from prying eyes and would-be thieves. When you share a resource on your network, however, you’re displaying that resource for all to see. Sure, you can set up password-protected user accounts and set the appropriate permissions for the resource, but others will still be able to see that the resource is shared.

To prevent this situation, it’s possible to share a resource and hide it at the same time. It’s also extremely easy to do: When you set up the shared resource, add a dollar sign ($) to the end of the share name. For example, if you’re setting up drive F for sharing, you could use F$ as the share name. This prevents the resource from appearing in the list of resources when you open a remote computer from the Network window.

In Figure 3, for example, you see the properties sheet for drive F, which shows the drive is shared with the following path:

\\Paulspc\f$

Figure 3. Hidden shared resources (such as drive F shown here) don’t appear in the browse list.

That is, the drive is shared on PaulsPC with the name F$. However, in the folder window, you can see that drive F doesn’t appear in the list of resources shared by PaulsPC.

Hidden Administration Shares

Hiding shares will work for the average user, but a savvy snoop will probably know about the $ trick. Therefore, you’ll probably want to set up your hidden shares with nonobvious names. Note, however, that Windows Vista sets up certain hidden shares for administrative purposes, including one for drive C (C$) and any other hard disk partitions you have on your system. Windows Vista also sets up the following hidden shares:

Share NameShared PathPurpose
ADMIN$%SystemRoot%Remote administration
IPC$N/ARemote interprocess communication
print$%SystemRoot%\System32\spool\driversAccess to printer drivers

You cannot delete or rename these administrative shares.


How do you connect to a hidden share? Well, you need to know the name of the shared resource, of course. When you know that, you can use any of the following techniques:

  • Select Windows Logo+R (or select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Run) to open the Run dialog box, type the UNC path for the hidden resource, and click OK. For example, to display the hidden share F$ on PaulsPC, you would enter this:

    \\paulspc\f$
  • In a Command Prompt session, type start, a space, the UNC path, and then press the Enter key. For example, to launch the hidden share F$ on PaulsPC, you would enter this:

    start \\paulspc\f$
  • Use the Map Network Drive command. In the Map Network Drive dialog box, type the UNC path for the hidden share in the Folder text box.

  • For a hidden shared printer, when Vista begins searching for available printers, click The Printer That I Want Isn’t Listed. In the Find a Printer By Name or TCP/IP Address dialog box, type the UNC path to the hidden printer in the Select a Shared Printer By Name text box.

Other -----------------
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Accessing Network Resources
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Learning Some Common Network Tasks
- Collecting Vista Events
- Automating Vista Events
- Exploring the Vista Task Scheduler
- Tracking Change in Vista : Turning on the audit policy, Exploring the Vista Event Log
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 4) - Assigning PC-Related GPOs, Troubleshooting and monitoring Group Policy
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 3) - Working with GPO tools
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 2) - Working with central policies
- Managing Change through Group Policy (part 1) - Working with Local Policies
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server