Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Vista

QuarkXPress 8 : Checking spelling (part 1) - Running a spell check, Creating custom spelling dictionaries

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
11/29/2012 11:12:33 AM

1. Assigning a language to words

For a more accurate spell check in multilingual documents—even a cookbook—you can assign a language to words. The language is used for spell check and hyphenation. For example, if you assign Spanish to “jalapeño,” it will not be flagged as a possible misspelling. To assign a language, select the words and choose an option from the Language drop-down menu in the Character Attributes dialog box (Style > Character) or the Character tab of the Measurements palette. For words that may not appear in any dictionary, you can choose None for the language so the word is never spell checked.

2. Running a spell check

To check spelling, choose an option from the Utilities > Check Spelling submenu: Word, Selection, Story, or Layout. Note that Story checks only the story (the series of linked items) containing the text insertion bar. After you choose an option from the Check Spelling submenu, the Word Count dialog box displays. The Total number of words reported is helpful for assigning stories by word count—and it gives you an idea of how much time the spell check will take. Click OK to bypass the Word Count dialog box.

In the Check Spelling dialog box, use the Replace, Lookup, and Skip buttons to handle each suspect word listed at the top of the dialog box (Figure 1). If the project has an auxiliary dictionary assigned to it, you can save spelling variations in it by clicking Add. (Note that QuarkXPress has no Skip All button—it flags every instance of each suspect word. As a result, saving spelling variations in auxiliary dictionaries can significantly speed up spell check.)

Figure 1. The Check Layout dialog box flags suspect words—words that do not match any in the QuarkXPress spelling dictionary—and displays possible replacement words.


If any stories in the layout are locked (Item > Lock > Story), the Search Locked Content check box lets you specify whether to spell check those stories.

Tip: Ignore Numbers, Internet Addresses, and File Paths

By default, QuarkXPress will flag words containing numbers such as NUMB3RS (the name of a TV show), Internet addresses, and file paths. If you do not want these flagged as possible misspellings by spell check, you can check Ignore Words With Numbers and Ignore Internet and File Addresses in the SpellCheck pane of the Preferences dialog box.

3. Creating custom spelling dictionaries

For a quicker and more accurate spell check, you can save words specific to your work in a custom spelling dictionary called an auxiliary dictionary. Each project can have one auxiliary dictionary associated with it. Once a project has an auxiliary dictionary, you can enter words into it or add them during spell check.

Creating an auxiliary dictionary

To create an auxiliary dictionary, choose Utilities > Auxiliary Dictionary. Click New, then specify a name and location for the dictionary file. The new auxiliary dictionary is associated with the current project file; if no projects are open, it is associated with all new projects. To add words to a project’s auxiliary dictionary, choose Utilities > Edit Auxiliary (Figure 2). Type each word—such as proper names, rare food spellings, and plural words missing from the regular dictionary—in the field and click Add. Click Save when you’re finished adding words. You can also add words to the auxiliary dictionary by clicking Add during spell check.

Figure 2. Add spelling variations and names in the Edit Auxiliary Dictionary dialog box.


Managing auxiliary dictionaries

Auxiliary dictionaries are separate files that you can share with other QuarkXPress users (Figure 3). You can assign one auxiliary dictionary per project, and the path to the dictionary file is saved with the project. If you move the file, QuarkXPress cannot find it and displays an alert when you start a spell check. (You can click OK to bypass this alert, or use Utilities > Auxiliary Dictionary to locate and open the file.)

Figure 3. An auxiliary dictionary file icon.

Other -----------------
- Adobe InDesign CS5 : Managing Pages and Books - Working with Master Pages
- Adobe InDesign CS5 : Managing Pages and Books - Creating Master Pages
- Adobe Illustrator CS5 : Understanding Appearances (part 2) - Targeting Attributes, Applying Multiple Attributes
- Adobe Illustrator CS5 : Understanding Appearances (part 1) - Understanding Attributes and Stacking Order
- Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 : Using Java Applets
- Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 : Installing Additional Server Behaviors, Creating Custom Server Behaviors
- Adobe Photoshop CS5 : Fixing Backlit Photos by Adding Fill Light
- Adobe Photoshop CS5 : Letting Camera Raw Auto-Correct Your Photos, Adding Snap to Your Images Using the Clarity Slider
- Adobe After Effects CS5 : Building a 3D object - Creating a backdrop for 3D animation
- Adobe After Effects CS5 : Building a 3D object - Working with 3D text
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server