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Using HyperTerminal for Modem-to-Modem Connections : Creating a New HyperTerminal Connection

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1/19/2012 6:15:07 PM
These days, the most common reason for including a modem in your computer is to connect to the Internet. However, many people still use their modems to connect to remote devices (such as electronic test analyzers), telecommunications equipment, as well as to other modems and thus propel themselves into the world of (non-Internet) online services and bulletin board systems (BBSs). To do this, you need a communications program (or terminal program) that can operate your modem and handle the behind-the-scenes dirty work of dialing, connecting, downloading, and uploading.

In Windows XP, the terminal program of choice is called HyperTerminal, and it should serve the needs of all but the most discriminating modem jockeys. HyperTerminal integrates seamlessly with Windows XP’s communications subsystem, and it offers several terminal emulation options, as well as support for most popular file transfer protocols, such as 1K Xmodem and Zmodem. The next few sections show you how to use HyperTerminal to set up, dial, and work with online connections.

To get HyperTerminal started, select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Communications, HyperTerminal. If you see a dialog box recommending that you make HyperTerminal your default Telnet program, activate the Don’t Ask Me This Question Again check box and then click Yes (or No, if you prefer to use Windows XP’s Microsoft Telnet Client or a different Telnet program).

Creating a New HyperTerminal Connection

When you start HyperTerminal, the Connection Description dialog box appears. If you don’t want to create a connection, click Cancel; otherwise, follow the steps I outline in the next few sections. Note that you set up the connection in three stages: defining the basic connection options, defining the connection’s settings, and specifying the connection’s modem properties.

Defining the Basic Connection Options

Here are the steps to follow to get the basic connection options in place:

1.
If the Connection Description dialog box, shown in Figure 1, isn’t already onscreen, select File, New Connection.

Figure 1. When you start a new HyperTerminal connection, the Connection Description dialog box appears.


2.
Use the Name text box to enter a descriptive name for the connection. Note that this entry will also serve as the primary name of the new HyperTerminal file (with the .HT extension), so you should follow Windows XP’s rules for long filenames.

3.
Use the Icon list to select an icon for the connection and then click OK. The Connect To dialog box, shown in Figure 2, appears.

Figure 2. Use the Connect To dialog box to supply HyperTerminal with the dialing details for your connection.


4.
Fill in the country/region code, area code, and phone number for the remote system.

5.
In the Connect Using drop-down list, you have four choices:

  • Choose the modem you want to use for the connection.

  • If you want to use HyperTerminal to connect to a PC via a serial cable that runs between the two machines’ serial ports, choose the appropriate serial port.

  • If your computer is part of a Virtual Private Network (VPN), select Microsoft VPN Adapter.

  • If the remote computer understands TCP/IP and you have the TCP/IP protocol installed on your machine (this is the default on all Windows XP systems), select TCP/IP (Winsock).

6.
Click OK. HyperTerminal displays the Connect dialog box.

At this point, the connection is set up to use the default settings you defined for your modem. If you want to use those settings, you can either click Dial to connect to the remote system or click Cancel to get to the main HyperTerminal window. I suggest clicking Cancel because then you can save the connection (by selecting File, Save).

Defining the Connection’s Modem Properties

If you don’t want to use the default modem settings, HyperTerminal enables you to define alternative settings for the connection. If you want to change the dialing properties for the connection, click the Dialing Properties button in the Connect dialog box. (If you canceled the Connect dialog box earlier, you can display it again by selecting Call, Connect.)

To change other settings (such as the connect speed and the terminal emulation), first display the property sheet for the connection by using either of the following methods:

  • In the HyperTerminal window, select File, Properties.

  • In the Connect dialog box, click Modify.

Figure 3 shows the property sheet that appears. The Connect To tab enables you to change the basic options (icon, country code, area code, and so on).

Figure 3. The property sheet for a connection.


For modem-related settings, click the Configure button to display the modem’s properties sheet.

Operator Assisted (Manual) DialThis check box is on the General tab of the modem property sheet. When you activate this option, each time you connect to the remote system, HyperTerminal displays a dialog box to prompt you to dial the phone number manually. This option is useful in hotels or in other situations when you might need to speak to an operator before you can dial. When you hear the remote modem, click the Connect button in the dialog box and then hang up the receiver.
Bring Up Terminal Window Before DialingThis check box is on the Advanced tab of the modem property sheet. When you activate this check box, each time you connect to the remote system, HyperTerminal displays the Pre-Dial Terminal Screen before it dials the modem. You can use this screen to enter modem commands (see your modem manual for a list of applicable commands). You enter your commands and then click the window’s Continue button.
Bring Up Terminal Window After DialingThis check box is on the Advanced tab of the modem property sheet. When you activate this check box, HyperTerminal displays the Post-Dial Terminal Screen after it has connected to the remote system. Again, you can use this screen to enter modem commands.

Defining the Connection’s Settings

To finish defining the connection, HyperTerminal has a few other options up its electronic sleeve. To view these options, display the connection’s properties sheet, and select the Settings tab, shown in Figure 4. Here’s the rundown:

Function, Arrow, and Ctrl Keys Act AsThese options determine how HyperTerminal reacts when you press any of the function keys, arrow keys, or Ctrl key combinations. If you activate the Terminal Keys option, HyperTerminal sends the keystrokes to the remote modem; if you activate Windows Keys, HyperTerminal applies the keystrokes to the Windows XP interface.
Backspace Key SendsUse these options to determine the key or key combination that HyperTerminal sends when you press Backspace. Note that Ctrl+H is the key combination that deletes the previously typed character on most UNIX systems.
EmulationUse this drop-down list to choose the terminal emulation you want to use with the remote system. The Auto Detect option tells HyperTerminal to attempt to determine the remote terminal type automatically. If you choose one of the specific terminal emulations, you can also click the Terminal Setup button to configure various aspects of the emulation. The available options depend on the emulation.
Telnet Terminal IDIf you’ll be using HyperTerminal as your Telnet client, use this text box to enter the terminal type you want to use.
Backscroll Buffer LinesThis setting determines the number of lines displayed by the remote system that HyperTerminal stores in its buffer. You can scroll up or down through this buffer by using the scrollbars or the Page Up and Page Down keys.
Play Sound When Connecting or DisconnectingThis check box determines whether HyperTerminal beeps the speaker whenever it connects and disconnects.
Input TranslationClick this button to select the character encoding system used by the host system: Shift-JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) or Standard JIS.
ASCII SetupClicking this button displays the ASCII Setup dialog box. These controls set various options for ASCII text you send to the remote system, as well as ASCII text that you receive.

Figure 4. Use the Settings tab to define terminal emulation and a few other options for the connection.


Tip

If you want to see the characters that you type in the HyperTerminal window, click ASCII Setup and then activate the Echo Typed Characters Locally check box.

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