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Accessing and Using Your Network : Collaborating with Windows Meeting Space (part 2)

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5. Inviting People to the Meeting

You can’t collaborate unless there are other people in the meeting, so your next step is to send invitations to those people you want to join the meeting. Here are the steps:

1.
Click Invite in the menu bar or click the Invite People icon to display the Invite People dialog box.

2.
Activate the check box beside each person you want to invite.

3.
Click Send Invitations.

Note

The list of users you see in the Invite People dialog box consists of those people signed in to People Near Me on your network. If you want others to attend, you can send them an email message. In the Invite People dialog box, click Invite Others then click Send and Invitation in E-mail.


A user who receives your invitation first sees the notification shown in Figure 4. Click View (or wait a few seconds), and you see the Invitation Details dialog box shown in Figure 5. Click Accept to join the meeting (this also loads Windows Meeting Space on the user’s machine; at this point, you enter the meeting password); click Decline to refuse the invitation or click Dismiss to do nothing.

Figure 4. You see this notification when a meeting invitation first arrives.


Figure 5. This dialog box appears a few seconds after the invitation arrives.


As people accept the invitations, their People Near Me name appears in the Windows Meeting Space Participants list.

6. Sharing a Handout

Before getting to the presentation, you might have some notes, instructions, background material, or other type of handout that you want to share with each participant. You do this by following these steps:

1.
Click Add in the menu bar or by click the Add a Handout icon. Meeting Space tells you the handouts will be copied to each computer.

2.
Click OK.

2.
Select your file and then click Open. The file appears immediately in the Handouts area, which shows the filename and the name of the person who added it.

Caution

You can share any type of file you want as a handout. However, remember that the remote users will only be able to view and work with the handout file if they have an application installed that’s associated with the handout’s file type.


7. Starting a Shared Session

When all your participants have joined the meeting and you’ve shared your handouts, it’s time to start the shared sessions. In Meeting Space, a shared session involves one of the participants performing some sort of action on his or her computer; the other participants see the results of those actions within their meeting window. You can perform three basic actions:

  • Demonstrating a specific program— This involves running the program on your computer so that other people in the meeting can watch what you do.

  • Collaborating on a document— This involves running a program and opening the document. The person who starts the shared sessions initially has control over the document, but control can pass to any participant.

  • Demonstrating any action— This involves sharing your desktop, which means that the other participants see anything you do on your computer.

Follow these steps to start a shared session:

1.
If you’re going to demonstrate a specific program or collaborate on a document, start the program or open the document.

2.
Click Share in the menu bar. Meeting Space asks whether you want the other participants to see your desktop.

3.
Click OK. The Start a Shared Session dialog box appears.

4.
You have three choices:

  • To share a program, select the program from the list of running applications.

  • To share a document, select Browse for a File to Open and Share.

  • To share your desktop, select Desktop.

5.
Click Share.

6.
If you are sharing a document, the Open dialog box appears. Select the document and then select Open.

Caution

Vista might automatically switch to a different color scheme if one of the participating computers can’t handle your current color scheme. For example, if you’re running the Aero scheme and a participating computer is running only Vista Basic, Vista switches to Basic.


Tip

To present your handout, right-click the handout and click Share to Meeting.


8. Controlling the Shared Session

After you begin a shared session, the Meeting Space window displays a You are sharing X message, where X is the object you’re sharing. You also see two links:

Show Me How My Shared Sessions Looks on Other Computers— Click this link to see your shared session from the point of view of a remote computer.

Stop Sharing— Click this link to shut down the shared session.

Vista also displays a You are sharing message as well as the meeting title in a title bar across the top of the desktop, as shown in Figure 6. You can use the controls in this bar as follows:

  • Click Pause to stop the shared session temporarily.

  • Click Give Control and then click a participant’s name to give that person control of the shared session.

  • Click Give Control, Take Control (or press Windows Logo+Esc) to resume control of the shared session.

  • Click Options, Shows Windows Meeting Space Window to switch to the Windows Meeting Space window.

  • Click the Stop button to stop the shared session.

Figure 6. This bar appears at the top of your desktop after you start a shared session.

Figure 7 shows what the shared session looks like on a remote computer.

Figure 7. The presentation as seen on a remote computer.

9. Ending the Shared Session

When the shared session is over, click the Stop Sharing link in the Meeting Space window or click the Stop Sharing button in the session title bar. If you don’t want to share anything else, select Meeting, Leave Meeting, or close the Meeting Space window.

Other -----------------
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Working with Offline Files and the Sync Center (part 2) - Synchronizing Offline Files, Handling Synchronization Conflicts
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Working with Offline Files and the Sync Center (part 1) - Working with Network Files Offline
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Sharing Resources with the Network (part 3) - Hiding Shared Resources
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Sharing Resources with the Network (part 2) - Sharing a Resource
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Sharing Resources with the Network (part 1) - Setting Up File and Printer Sharing, Deactivating the Sharing Wizard
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Accessing Network Resources
- Accessing and Using Your Network : Learning Some Common Network Tasks
- Collecting Vista Events
- Automating Vista Events
- Exploring the Vista Task Scheduler
 
 
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