Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Vista

Participating in Internet Newsgroups : Notes on Working with Newsgroup Messages, Following Up a Message, Posting a New Message

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
6/30/2013 5:23:20 PM

Notes on Working with Newsgroup Messages

You can treat newsgroup messages in much the same way that you treat email messages. That is, you can view the message text in the preview pane, open the message in its own window, save the message, copy it to another folder, and so on. Here are a few notes on tasks that are specific to newsgroup messages:

  • Dealing with threads— If you see a plus sign (+) beside a message header, it means that replies exist for this header. To see the other messages in the thread, click the plus sign or highlight the message and press plus sign (+) on your numeric keypad.

  • Unscrambling ROT13 messages— Some messages are encoded using a scheme called ROT13. This scheme encodes the message by shifting the letters of the alphabet 13 positions to the right, and wrapping around to the front of the alphabet when it reaches the end. (The ROT part is short for rotate.) If you come across a message encoded using ROT13, you can use Windows Mail’s built-in decoder. To use it, select Message, Unscramble(ROT13).

  • Canceling one of your messages— If you post a message and then have second thoughts, you can remove it from the newsgroup by highlighting it and selecting Message, Cancel Message. (This command is available only for messages you’ve sent. People who have downloaded your message will still see it.)

  • Combining and decoding multiple attachments— Some multimedia groups post large binary files that are split into multiple posts. To extract the original binary file from these posts, first select all the posts. Then select Message, Combine and Decode to display the Order for Decoding dialog box. Use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to order the posts (the subject lines usually tell you the proper order), and then click OK.


Following Up a Message

Usenet is at its best when it’s interactive: questions are asked and answered; the swords of conflicting opinions are crossed; debaters cut and parry to score points on contentious issues. The engine behind all this verbal jousting is, of course, the follow-up message. To post a follow-up with Windows Mail, follow these steps:

1.
Select the original message in the message list.

2.
Select Message, Reply to Group. (You can also press Ctrl+G or click the Reply Group toolbar button.) Windows Mail opens a message composition window and fills it with the text from the original article.

3.
Cut out any unnecessary text from the original article.

4.
Type your own text in the article body.

5.
Select File, Send Message. (Alternatives for faster service: Alt+S or click the Send button.) Windows Mail displays a dialog box telling you that your message has been sent to the news server and that it might not appear immediately.

6.
Click OK.

Tip

Instead of posting a follow-up message, you might prefer to reply directly to the author via email. To do this, select the message and select Message, Reply to Author (or else press Ctrl+R or click the Reply button). Take a look at the address to make sure it has not been munged—altered slightly so that if a spam bot picks it up, the address will be unusable. If so, delete the extra characters that the user has inserted in the address.

If you want to send a message to both the group and the author, select Message, Reply to All, or press Ctrl+Shift+R.

Posting a New Message

As I’ve said before, original messages are the lifeblood of Usenet because they get the discussions off the ground and give the rest of us something to read (as well as laugh at, sneer at, and hurl verbal abuse at). If you’re feeling creative, you can take advantage of this section, which shows you how to post a new message from Windows Mail.

To get started, select the newsgroup to which you want to post, and then use any of the following techniques:

  • Select Message, New Message

  • Press Ctrl+N

  • Click the Write Message button on the toolbar

Whichever method you choose, the New Message window appears.There are three main differences:

  • If you have multiple news server accounts, you see a News Server list from which you select the server you want to use.

  • The To field is replaced by a Newsgroups field.

  • For Microsoft Communities newsgroups, you see a Post Type section with the following three options: Comment, Question, and Suggestion. Select the option that describes your post.

The Newsgroups field should show the name of the current newsgroup. If you want to send your message to more than one newsgroup, separate the newsgroup names with a comma (,).Alternatively, click Newsgroups and then choose a newsgroup from the dialog box that appears.

To post your message, select File, Send Message (or press Alt+S, or click the Send button in the toolbar).

Other -----------------
- Participating in Internet Newsgroups : Downloading Messages
- Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : Understanding the Startup Process (part 3) - Kernel Loading Phase
- Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : Understanding the Startup Process (part 2) - Windows Boot Manager Phase
- Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : Understanding the Startup Process (part 1) - Power-on Self Test Phase, Initial Startup Phase
- Participating in Internet Newsgroups : Setting Up a News Account, Working with Newsgroups in Windows Mail
- Participating in Internet Newsgroups : Some Usenet Basics
- Configuring Startup and Troubleshooting Startup Issues : What’s New with Windows Vista Startup
- Managing Client Protection : Microsoft Forefront Client Security
- Managing Client Protection : Using Windows Defender (part 2)
- Managing Client Protection : Using Windows Defender (part 1)
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server