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Windows XP

Setting Up a Peer-to-Peer Network : Running the Network Setup Wizard

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Running the Network Setup Wizard

In previous versions of Windows, setting up a network usually involved working with obscure settings. These are still available in Windows XP, but there’s also a less perplexing route to network connectivity: the Network Setup Wizard. Even if you enjoy working with TCP/IP settings and network protocols, using the Network Setup Wizard is the best way to ensure trouble-free network operation.

Windows XP has a feature called Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) that enables you to share one computer’s Internet connection with other computers on the network. How you start setting up your network depends on whether you’ll be using ICS:

  • If you’ll be using ICS, run the Network Setup Wizard on the computer that will be sharing its connection. This machine is called the ICS host. Make sure that this machine’s Internet connection is active before running the wizard. When you’re done, you can run the Network Setup Wizard on the other clients, in any order.

  • If you won’t be using ICS, run the Network Setup Wizard on any computer, in any order.

Configuring the ICS Host

Here are the steps to follow to run the Network Setup Wizard on the ICS host computer:

1.
Connect to the Internet.

2.
Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Communications, Network Setup Wizard.

3.
In the initial Network Setup Wizard dialog box, click Next.

4.
The next wizard dialog box outlines some tasks you must have completed before continuing (such as installing NICs). You’ve done all that, so click Next.

5.
If the wizard locates a shared Internet connection elsewhere on the network, the Do You Want to Use the Shared Connection? dialog box appears. In this case, activate the No, Let Me Choose Another Way to Connect to the Internet option, and then click Next.

6.
In the Select a Connection Method dialog box, make sure that the This Computer Connects Directly to the Internet option is activated, and then click Next. The wizard displays a list of the connections defined on your system.

7.
Select the Internet connection and click Next.

8.
Run through the rest of the Network Setup Wizard’s steps, as described later in the “Completing the Network Setup Wizard” section.

Configuring Other ICS Machines

Here are the steps to follow to run the Network Setup Wizard on the other computers in an ICS network:

1.
Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Communications, Network Setup Wizard.

2.
In the first two Network Setup Wizard dialog boxes, click Next. The Do You Want to Use the Shared Connection? dialog box appears.

3.
Make sure that the Yes, Use the Existing Shared Connection for This Computer’s Internet Access option is activated, and then click Next.

4.
Run through the rest of the Network Setup Wizard’s steps, as described later in the “Completing the Network Setup Wizard” section.

Configuring a Network with a Residential Gateway

If your network uses a broadband Internet connection attached to a residential gateway, follow these steps to run the Network Setup Wizard to configure the network to use the gateway:

1.
Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Communications, Network Setup Wizard.

2.
In the first two Network Setup Wizard dialog boxes, click Next.

3.
If the wizard locates a shared Internet connection elsewhere on the network, the Do You Want to Use the Shared Connection? dialog box appears. In this case, activate the No, Let Me Choose Another Way to Connect to the Internet option, and then click Next.

4.
In the Select a Connection Method dialog box, activate the This Computer Connects to the Internet Through a Residential Gateway or Through Another Computer on My Network option, and then click Next.

5.
Run through the rest of the Network Setup Wizard’s steps, as described later in the “Completing the Network Setup Wizard” section.

Configuring a Network Without the Internet

If your network doesn’t have Internet access, follow these steps to run the Network Setup Wizard to configure the network properly:

1.
Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, Communications, Network Setup Wizard.

2.
In the first two Network Setup Wizard dialog boxes, click Next.

3.
If the wizard locates a shared Internet connection elsewhere on the network, the Do You Want to Use the Shared Connection? dialog box appears. In this case, activate the No, Let Me Choose Another Way to Connect to the Internet option, and then click Next.

4.
In the Select a Connection Method dialog box, activate the Other option and click Next.

5.
Activate the This Computer Belongs to a Network That Does Not Have an Internet Connection, and then click Next.

6.
Run through the rest of the Network Setup Wizard’s steps, as described in the next section, “Completing the Network Setup Wizard.”

Completing the Network Setup Wizard

The rest of the Network Setup Wizard’s steps are common to all configurations:

1.
If you have more than one connection on your computer, the wizard offers to bridge the connections for you. In this case, activate Let Me Choose the Connections to My Network and click Next. Now activate the check box beside the connection that you use to access the network and click Next.

2.
Type a computer description and a computer name (which must be unique among the networked computers) and click Next.

3.
Type a workgroup name (which must be the same for all the networked computers) and click Next.

4.
Click Next to apply the network settings.

5.
The wizard asks how you want to run the Network Setup Wizard on your other computers. You have four choices (click Next when you’re done):

Create a Network Setup DiskChoose this option if you’ll be including Windows 9x or Me computers in the network. This creates a floppy disk that includes a version of the Network Setup Wizard. You insert this disk into a Windows 9x/Me client and run the wizard on that computer.
Use the Network Setup Disk I Already HaveChoose this option if you’ve already created a network setup disk.
Use My Windows XP CDChoose this option to run the Network Setup Wizard on the Windows 9x/Me computers using the Windows XP disc. In this case, you insert the disc in the other computer. When the Welcome window appears, click Perform Additional Tasks and then click Set Up a Home or Small Office Network.
Just Finish the WizardChoose this option if you don’t need to run the wizard on Windows 9x/Me computers.

6.
Click Finish.
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