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Microsoft Visio 2013 : Collaborating on and Publishing Diagrams - Refreshing diagrams published to Visio Services

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In the preceding section, you saved a diagram to Visio Services, applied a data graphic, saved the changes, and then refreshed the web view of the drawing.

In this exercise, you will make more extensive changes to the diagram, including linking it to an Excel workbook, changing the data in the workbook, and then observing how those changes ripple through the diagram and the web rendering.

Important

In order for Visio Services to have access to data in an Excel workbook, the workbook must be stored in SharePoint prior to linking to it from your Visio drawing.

  1. On the Data tab, in the External Data group, click Link Data to Shapes.

  2. On the first page of the Data Selector Wizard, click Microsoft Excel workbook, click Next, click the Browse button, and then navigate to, and open, the copy of the Excel workbook that you saved to SharePoint.

    Tip

    When you click the Browse button in the wizard and the Open dialog box appears, it may be easier to navigate to your Excel workbook first in your web browser. After locating the correct document, simply copy and paste its URL into the address bar in the Open dialog box.

    image with no caption
  3. On the third page of the Data Selector Wizard , select the worksheet named Status Data$, and then click Next.

    image with no caption
  4. Accept the recommendation to use Step Number as the unique identifier in the status data, click Next, and then click Finish. The External Data window opens.

  5. On the Data tab, in the External Data group, click Automatically Link, and then click Next on the first page of the Automatic Link Wizard .

    image with no caption
  6. Select Step Number from the drop-down list under both Data Column and Shape Field, click Next, and then click Finish. You have linked data from your Excel workbook to the shapes on the Main Process page of your diagram. Notice that the fill colors of some shapes have changed because the status values in the linked data are different.

    Important

    The automatic linking function in Visio works on one page at a time. You can confirm this by viewing the left end of the External Data window: a link symbol appears for steps 101–105 but not for the steps in the 200 range that are on the other page. You will link the 200-series steps to shapes on the Print and Fulfill page later in this exercise.

    image with no caption
  7. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save , then switch to your web browser and click the Refresh button in the upper-left corner of the Visio diagram (do not click the browser’s refresh button). The color changes now appear in the web rendering.

    image with no caption
  8. In the upper-right corner of the Visio diagram, click Main Process, and then click Print and Fulfill to view that page.

    Tip

    Because the Fulfill Ticket Order shape contains a hyperlink to page 2, you can also point to that shape and then press Ctrl+click to move to the second page.

    image with no caption
  9. Switch to Visio, click the page name tab for Print and Fulfill, and then apply the Color by Status data graphic to all shapes on this page.

  10. On the Data tab, in the External Data group, click Automatically Link, and complete the Automatic Link Wizard for this page just as you did in steps 5 and 6 earlier in this exercise. The shapes on this page are now linked to Excel data on SharePoint as you will demonstrate in the remaining steps of this exercise.

  11. Switch to Excel. Use the drop-down list in the Status column to change the status for Step Number 201 to Completed, change the Status for Step Number 202 to In Progress, and then on the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save . At this point, you have changed the data in the copy of the workbook that resides on SharePoint.

  12. Switch to Visio. On the Data tab, in the External Data group, click Refresh All, and then click Close.

  13. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save . The changes from Excel that are now visible in Visio have been saved in SharePoint.

  14. Return to your open web browser. If the web view of the diagram has not already updated, click the Refresh button.

    image with no caption

    The web view of your Visio diagram reflects much more than changes in data graphics. In the final steps of this exercise, you will add several shapes to the Visio diagram and observe those changes in the browser.

  15. Switch to Visio. Drag a Gateway shape from the BPMN Basic Shapes stencil and drop it on the connector between the Start Event shape and the Print tickets shape, and then add a new connector from the top of the gateway to the Send Tickets shape.

  16. Type text on three shapes:

    • On the new gateway, type etickets?

    • On the connector from etickets? to Print tickets, type No.

    • On the connector from etickets? to Send tickets, type Yes.

  17. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click Save .

  18. Switch to your browser and click the Refresh button. The browser view of your diagram shows the new shapes.

    image with no caption

Note

CLEAN UP Save your changes to the Theater Ticketing Diagram file and close it. Close your web browser.

This exercise involved a lot of switching between applications in order to demonstrate the interactions among those applications. In the real world, you are unlikely to be moving back and forth as much. For example, in a typical scenario, you would have linked your diagram to data and selected a data graphic once, prior to saving to SharePoint. From then on, you might periodically update a database or Excel workbook and occasionally view the changes in your browser. In another common scenario, you might be responsible for maintaining and updating the data, while many other people use their web browsers to view the dashboard you created.
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