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Integrating DataMarket Data with Excel and SharePoint - Consume Windows Azure Data in Excel 2010

7/20/2011 6:35:17 PM
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In this first exercise, you’re going to integrate Marketplace DataMarket data (specifically the DATA.gov crime statistics data feed) with Excel 2010 by using the Marketplace DataMarket add-in for Excel that you just downloaded. After you integrate some crime data into Excel, you will create a PivotChart and PivotTable, and then publish the Excel document to SharePoint. Finally, you’ll use Excel Services to publish select portions of the Excel document to SharePoint using Excel Web Access Web Parts.

You will begin by consuming the DataMarket data in Excel 2010.

Consume Windows Azure Data in Excel 2010

1. Consume Windows Azure Data in Excel 2010
  1. Open Excel 2010, and click the Data tab on the Excel 2010 ribbon.

  2. Click the Import Data From Windows Azure Marketplace DataMarket button. This opens the Marketplace DataMarket custom task pane.

  3. In the custom task pane, add your account key, and then click Sign In. The data feeds you added to your Marketplace DataMarket subscriptions will appear in the custom task pane.



  4. Find the DATA.gov feed listed in the custom task pane, and then click Import Data.

  5. In the Query Builder dialog box, click Add Filter, and select State. Then type Washington in the filter field. This filter returns the same data you saw earlier when you explored the data via your web browser.



  6. Click Import Data to import the data from Windows Azure Marketplace DataMarket into your Excel 2010 document.

    The result of this import should look similar to the following image.



  7. The data is imported as a table object, so you can filter, sort, hide, and show columns, and create charts, PivotTables, and so on, to create an analysis of the data.

    More than likely, you’ll want to create a filtered analysis of DataMarket data within Excel, and this is where you have some great capabilities at your fingertips. For example, you can use the formatting, charting, or PivotTable and PivotChart capabilities built into Excel to create compelling analyses. Explore the different features of Excel after you’ve imported the data to gain an understanding of the types of analyses you can build. For now, continue this exercise to create a PivotChart and PivotTable.


    Note:

    More Info You can find more information on how to use Excel 2010 at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/what-s-new-in-excel-2010-HA010369709.aspx.


  8. Click the Insert tab, click the PivotTable arrow (not the button), and then select PivotChart. Select the default table range and location, and then click OK.

  9. In the Field List, select a set of options such as State, City, ViolentCrime, Burglary, and so on. Excel automatically generates a PivotTable and a PivotChart for you, as shown in the following image. You’ll want to filter the options down to a point where the data in the chart becomes legible.



  10. After you’ve finished creating the PivotChart, save the file to a local directory.

You’ve now completed the first exercise. However, the document you just created is one that only you have access to on your local computer. To expose this type of information to others in your organization, you’ll often want to publish documents or elements of documents such as this to SharePoint. By publishing, you can share the entire document or build dashboards out of, for example, the charts or tables that are generated automatically during the PivotChart and PivotTable creation process.

Next, you’ll walk through the process to expose elements of the document to SharePoint by using Excel Services.

2. Publish Excel Objects to Excel Services
  1. Open your SharePoint site, and navigate to a document library.

  2. Click the Documents tab, click Upload Document, and then click Upload Document.

  3. Click Browse in the Upload Document dialog box, and then select the Excel document you created in the previous exercise and saved to your local drive.

  4. Click the Options menu beside the document, and select Edit In Microsoft Excel.



  5. Click File, select Save & Send, and then click Save To SharePoint.

  6. Click Publish Options, which is located in the upper-right corner of the Backstage view.

  7. In the Publish Options dialog box, select Items In The Workbook in the drop-down list. Select all the items.



  8. Click OK, and save the Excel document back to your SharePoint site by clicking Save.

  9. Lastly, right-click the link to the Excel document in the document library, and select Copy Shortcut. Paste the link somewhere convenient (for example, in a Notepad file) .

At this point, you’ve saved the Excel document that contains Marketplace DataMarket data to SharePoint and have published the objects that make up the document to SharePoint by using Excel Services; that is, the chart and table objects. With Excel Services, you can expose worksheets, charts, named ranges, and other objects in an Excel document.


Note:

To get a more controlled view of your data, you can copy and paste data (just the values) from the table into a new worksheet, create a separate named range, and then style that table as you like. That involves some manual work—but you’ll end up with a new named range that exposes the exact data you want to create within a cleanly formatted named range.


3. Surface Windows Azure Marketplace DataMarket Data by Using SharePoint Excel Services
  1. Navigate to your SharePoint site, and click Site Actions | View All Site Content.

  2. Click Create, select Web Part Page, click Create, and provide a name for your page (for example, Crime Data). Leave the default location in Site Assets.

  3. After you’ve created the Crime Data page, navigate to it and click Site Actions, and then Edit Page.

  4. Click Add A Web Part, and select Business Data.

  5. Within the Business Data category, select Excel Web Access, and click Add.

  6. After the Web Part has been added to the page, click the Click Here To Open The Tool Pane option.

  7. In the Workbook field, enter the shortcut you copied to Notepad (or your Clipboard) in the previous exercise, which points to the Excel document that you uploaded into your SharePoint site. (If you didn’t copy and paste the link, navigate to the document library where you uploaded the Excel document, right-click the document, and select Copy Shortcut.)

  8. In the Named Item field, add the item you want to expose—these are the items you published using Excel Services and the Publish Options dialog box. The following image illustrates the link and PivotTable1 object configured in the Excel Web Access Web Part. (Note that you may need to configure the height and width of the Web Part. You can do this by expanding the Appearance section in the Options pane and entering a custom height and width.)



  9. When done, click OK.

    SharePoint now exposes filtered and sorted data by using Excel Services, as shown in the following image.



    You can also create other Excel Web Access Web Parts and expose different parts of the Excel document to create a Crime dashboard. It is noteworthy that you can also go beyond just using the Excel Web Access Web Part and use the Excel Services REST URI to expose elements in the Excel document to SharePoint. For example, the following REST URI exposes the chart that was automatically created in the PivotChart process (Chart 1) in the web browser:

    http://blueyonderdemo/_vti_bin/ExcelRest.aspx/newprops/Crime/Contoso_Store_Crime_Supplement.xlsx/Model/Charts(‘Chart%201’)

    You can use this same REST URI to expose this image in an Image Viewer Web Part. To do this, simply navigate to your SharePoint site, click Site Actions | Edit Page, and then insert a new Image Viewer Web Part. Click the Open The Tool Pane link in the newly added Web Part and paste the Excel Services REST URI into the Image Link field. What results is something similar to Figure 2-5, which you can use in your dashboards. This reference then uses the Excel document (within which the chart object lives) as the common point of reference; every time you update the chart, the image in the Web Part also updates without any intervention on your part.

    Thus far, you’ve seen how to integrate Marketplace DataMarket data to SharePoint without using any code. This type of integration is great for quickly building dashboards and reports that you can expose in SharePoint by using the different features of Excel Services.

Figure 2-5. Image Viewer Web Part linked to Excel data.

Other -----------------
- Using Cloud Services : Collaborating on Word Processing (part 2)
- Using Cloud Services : Collaborating on Word Processing (part 1)
- Using Cloud Services : Collaborating on Project Management
- Windows Azure Marketplace DataMarket (part 2)
- Windows Azure Marketplace DataMarket (part 1) - WCF Data Services and Publicly Consumable Data Feeds
- Accessing the Surveys Application : Content Delivery Network
- Accessing the Surveys Application : Authentication and Authorization
- Working with Data in the Surveys Application : Using SQL Azure
- Using Cloud Services : Collaborating on Contact Management - Exploring Contact Management and CRM Applications
- Using Cloud Services : Collaborating on Event Management - Exploring Event Management Applications
 
 
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