Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
Windows Azure

Surfacing SQL Azure Data in Bing Maps by Using the Client Object Model

9/10/2011 4:24:34 PM
- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
In this example, you’ll use the SharePoint client object model instead of the server object model. Whereas the server object model provides a way for you to interact with SharePoint on the server, you can use the SharePoint client object model to interact with SharePoint from a remote client such as a .NET Framework application, JavaScript, or in the case of this exercise, Silverlight.

The exercise assumes that you’ve created an external list that points to the StoreInformation table in the Customers database. The external list name should be called Stores_From_Azure. Before starting this exercise, you’ll also need to download the Bing Maps Silverlight control and SDK. You can download these items from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=beb29d27-6f0c-494f-b028-1e0e3187e830.


Note:

More Info If you’d like to learn more about the Bing Maps Silverlight Control SDK, there is an interactive SDK at http://www.microsoft.com/maps/isdk/silverlight/.


1. Integrating Silverlight, SQL Azure, Bing, and the SharePoint Client Object Model
  1. Right-click the Visual Studio solution, and select Add | New Project.

  2. Select the installed Silverlight templates, and click Silverlight Application.

  3. Provide a name for the project (such as Bing_LOB_UI), and click OK.

  4. Right-click the newly created project, and select Add Reference. Click the Browse tab (or you might have them listed on the Recent tab), and add the Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Silverlight.dll and the Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Silverlight.Runtime.dll to the project by navigating to the folder system (that is, C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\TEMPLATE\LAYOUTS\ClientBin) and adding the libraries to your project.

  5. Right-click the project, and select Add Reference. Click the Browse tab, and navigate to the install location of the SDK (that is, C:\Program Files\Bing Maps Silverlight Control\V1\Libraries), select Microsoft.Maps.MapControl.dll, and click OK.

  6. Right-click MainPage.xaml, and select View Designer. Add the bolded code as per the following code snippet:

    <UserControl x:Class="Bing_LOB_UI.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="500" d:DesignWidth="1000"
    xmlns:sdk="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation/sdk"
    xmlns:m="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Maps.MapControl;
    assembly=Microsoft.Maps.MapControl">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Height="500" Width="1000">
    <Grid.Background>
    <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
    <GradientStop Color="Black" Offset="0"/>
    <GradientStop Color="White" Offset="1"/>
    </LinearGradientBrush>
    </Grid.Background>
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <RowDefinition/>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <Rectangle Margin="361,50,28,22" Stroke="Black" Fill="#FF6D6D76"
    Opacity="0.9" />
    <m:Map x:Name="MainMap" CredentialsProvider="12345"
    AnimationLevel="Full"
    Mode="AerialWithLabels"
    ZoomLevel="5"
    Center="38.000,-95.000" Margin="361,50,28,22">
    <m:Map.Children>
    <m:MapLayer x:Name="Pushpins"/>
    <m:MapLayer x:Name="TooltipLayer">
    <Canvas x:Name="Tooltip" Visibility="Collapsed" Opacity="0.9">
    <Rectangle x:Name="ContentPopupRectangle" Fill="DarkBlue"
    Canvas.Left="0" Canvas.Top="0" Height="100" Width="300"
    RadiusX="10" RadiusY="10"/>
    <StackPanel Canvas.Left="10" Canvas.Top="10">
    <TextBlock x:Name="StoreTooltipText" FontSize="12"
    FontWeight="Bold" >
    </TextBlock>
    <TextBlock x:Name="StoreTooltipDescription"
    Foreground="White"
    Width="275" FontSize="8" FontWeight="Bold"
    TextWrapping="Wrap"/>
    </StackPanel>
    </Canvas>
    </m:MapLayer>
    </m:Map.Children>
    </m:Map>
    <sdk:Label Foreground="BlanchedAlmond" x:Name="lblViewStoreTitle"
    FontWeight="Black" Width="150" HorizontalAlignment="Left"
    Margin="20,28,0,0" Content="View Store Records"
    VerticalAlignment="Top"/>
    <!--<ListBox HorizontalAlignment="Left" x:Name="lstbxAzureStoreRecords"
    Height="398" Margin="18,50,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top"
    Width="321"/>-->
    <ListBox x:Name="lstStores" Width="325" Height="375" Margin="17,68,658,57">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
    <Border Margin="5" BorderThickness="1" BorderBrush="Black"
    CornerRadius="4" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch">
    <Grid Margin="3">
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>
    <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>
    <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <TextBlock x:Name="txtblckStoreName" Width="275"
    FontFamily="Arial"
    FontSize="10" FontWeight="Bold"
    Text="{Binding StoreName}">
    </TextBlock>
    <TextBlock x:Name="txtblckStoreAddress" Grid.Row="1"
    FontFamily="Arial"
    FontSize="8" Text="{Binding StoreAddress}">
    </TextBlock>
    <TextBlock x:Name="txtblckStorePhone" Grid.Row="2"
    FontFamily="Arial"
    FontSize="8" Text="{Binding StorePhone}"></TextBlock>
    </Grid>
    </Border>
    </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
    </ListBox>

    <Button Content="Zoom" HorizontalAlignment="Left" x:Name="btnZoomOnStore"
    Margin="20,466,0,12" Width="75"
    d:LayoutOverrides="Height"
    Click="btnZoomOnStore_Click"/>
    <sdk:Label Content="Store Locations" FontWeight="Black"
    Foreground="BlanchedAlmond"
    HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="361,28,0,0" Name="lblMap"
    VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="150" />
    </Grid>
    </UserControl>


    Note that you’ve added the controls listed in the following table in your Visual Web Part UI.

    Control TypeControl Name
    MapMainMap
    RectangleContentPopupRectangle
    TextBlockStoreTooltipText
    TextBlockStoreTooltipDescription
    LabellblViewStoreTitle
    LabellblMap
    ListboxlstStores
    TextBlocktxtblckStoreName
    TextBlocktxtblckStoreAddress
    TextBlocktxtblckStorePhone
    ButtonbtnZoomOnStore

    The UI code is broken out into two major areas. The Silverlight Bing Maps Control is located to the right of the UI, and you can see that, given your predefined center point and zoom level, the map has a default starting position. On the left is the listbox, where you’ll use data-binding to bind TextBlock text properties to the custom object you’ll build dynamically within the Silverlight application—essentially reading the SQL Azure data, which is represented in the SharePoint external list. When you click a specific record in the listbox and click the Zoom button, the Bing Map will then center and zoom in on that particular store.

    When you’ve added the UI code, the UI in Visual Studio should look similar to the following image.



  7. Right-click the project, and select Add | Class. Provide a name for the class (such as StoreDetails), and add the following bolded code:

    ...
    using Microsoft.Maps.MapControl;

    namespace Bing_LOB_UI
    {
    public class StoreDetails
    {
    public Location StoreLocation { get; set; }
    public string StoreName { get; set; }
    public string StoreAddress { get; set; }
    public string StorePhone { get; set; }
    public string StoreHours { get; set; }
    }
    }

  8. Right-click the project, and select Add | Class. Provide a name for the class (such as StoreInfo), and add the bolded code as shown in the following code snippet:

    ...

    namespace Bing_LOB_UI
    {
    public class StoreInfo
    {
    public string StoreName { get; set; }
    public string StoreAddress { get; set; }
    public string StorePhone { get; set; }
    public string Latitude { get; set; }
    public string Longitude { get; set; }
    }
    }

  9. Right-click MainPage.xaml and select View Code. Add the bolded code as shown here to the XAML code-behind:

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Net;
    using System.Windows;
    using System.Windows.Controls;
    using System.Windows.Documents;
    using System.Windows.Input;
    using System.Windows.Media;
    using System.Windows.Media.Animation;
    using System.Windows.Shapes;
    using Microsoft.Maps.MapControl;
    using Microsoft.SharePoint.Client;


    namespace Bing_LOB_UI
    {
    public partial class MainPage : UserControl
    {
    ClientContext clientContext = null;
    Web web = null;

    List<StoreDetails> storeDetailsList = new List<StoreDetails>();
    List<StoreInfo> listOfStoreSummaries = new List<StoreInfo>();

    IEnumerable<ListItem> bcsStoreList;

    MapLayer OtherStores = new MapLayer();

    public MainPage()
    {
    InitializeComponent();
    this.Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(MainPage_Loaded);
    }

    void MainPage_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
    GetListsDataFromSharePoint();
    }

    private void GetListsDataFromSharePoint()
    {
    GetSPListData();
    }

    private void GetSPListData()
    {
    using (clientContext = new ClientContext("http://blueyonderdemo"))
    {
    web = clientContext.Web;
    clientContext.Load(web);
    var bcsListFromAzure = web.Lists.GetByTitle("Stores_From_Azure");
    CamlQuery query = new CamlQuery();
    IQueryable<ListItem> bcsListItems = bcsListFromAzure.GetItems(query);
    bcsStoreList = clientContext.LoadQuery(bcsListItems);
    clientContext.ExecuteQueryAsync(OnStoresRequestSucceeded,
    OnRequestFailed);
    }
    }

    private void OnStoresRequestSucceeded(object sender,
    ClientRequestSucceededEventArgs e)
    {
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(FillStoreList);
    }

    private void OnRequestFailed(object sender, ClientRequestFailedEventArgs e)
    {
    Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() =>
    {
    MessageBox.Show("Error: " + e.Message);
    });
    }

    private void FillStoreList()
    {
    storeDetailsList.Clear();

    foreach (var x in bcsStoreList)
    {
    StoreDetails objStoreDetails = new StoreDetails();
    objStoreDetails.StoreName =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(3).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreAddress =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(4).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StorePhone =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(5).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreHours =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(8).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreLocation = new Location(
    Convert.ToDouble(x.FieldValues.ElementAt(6).Value.ToString()),
    Convert.ToDouble(x.FieldValues.ElementAt(7).Value.ToString()));
    storeDetailsList.Add(objStoreDetails);
    StoreInfo objStoreSummary = new StoreInfo();
    objStoreSummary.StoreName =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(3).Value.ToString();
    objStoreSummary.StoreAddress =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(4).Value.ToString();
    objStoreSummary.StorePhone =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(5).Value.ToString();
    listOfStoreSummaries.Add(objStoreSummary);
    }

    lstStores.ItemsSource = listOfStoreSummaries;

    AddStoresToMap();
    }

    private void AddStoresToMap()
    {
    Pushpins.Children.Clear();

    for (int i = 0; i < storeDetailsList.Count; i++)
    {
    string description = "Store: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreName
    + "\nAddress: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreAddress
    + "\nPhone: " + storeDetailsList[i].StorePhone
    + "\nHours: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreHours;

    CreatePushpin(storeDetailsList[i].StoreLocation, description);
    }
    }

    private void CreatePushpin(Location location, string description)
    {
    Pushpin pushpin = new Pushpin();
    pushpin.Width = 7;
    pushpin.Height = 10;
    pushpin.Tag = description;
    pushpin.Location = location;
    Pushpins.AddChild(pushpin, location, PositionOrigin.Center);

    pushpin.MouseEnter += new MouseEventHandler(Shape_MouseEnter);
    pushpin.MouseLeave += new MouseEventHandler(Shape_MouseLeave);
    }

    private void Shape_MouseEnter(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
    if (sender.ToString() == "Microsoft.Maps.MapControl.Pushpin")
    {
    Pushpin content = sender as Pushpin;
    Canvas.SetZIndex(content, 500);
    StoreTooltipText.Text = content.Name;
    StoreTooltipDescription.Text = content.Tag.ToString();
    }
    else
    {
    MapPolygon storeContent = sender as MapPolygon;
    Canvas.SetZIndex(storeContent, 500);
    StoreTooltipText.Text = "ID: " + storeContent.Name;
    StoreTooltipDescription.Text = storeContent.Tag.ToString();
    }

    Point point = e.GetPosition(MainMap);
    Location location = MainMap.ViewportPointToLocation(point);
    MapLayer.SetPosition(Tooltip, location);
    MapLayer.SetPositionOffset(Tooltip, new Point(25, -50));

    Tooltip.Visibility = Visibility.Visible;
    }

    private void Shape_MouseLeave(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
    UIElement content = sender as UIElement;
    Canvas.SetZIndex(content, 100);
    Tooltip.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
    }

    private void btnZoomOnStore_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
    Location locationFilter = new Location();
    StoreInfo tempStoreRecord = new StoreInfo();

    tempStoreRecord = (StoreInfo)lstStores.SelectedItem;
    string storeNameFilter = tempStoreRecord.StoreName;

    var locationData = from store in storeDetailsList
    where store.StoreName == storeNameFilter
    select store;

    foreach (var item in locationData)
    {
    locationFilter = item.StoreLocation;
    }

    MainMap.SetView(locationFilter, 10);
    }
    }
    }


    There’s a lot of code here, but let’s break it out into three parts:

    1. Retrieval of SQL Azure data from external list

    2. Population of map

    3. Store zoom functionality

    To retrieve the SQL Azure data from the SharePoint external list, you use the two custom objects that you created (StoreDetails and StoreInfo). You could optimize the code with one object, but I wanted to keep their usage separate; that is, the StoreDetails is used for the map and the StoreInfo is used to populate the listbox. For example, in the following code snippet, you’ll note that you’re first calling the GetSPListData method, which is where you’re using the SharePoint client object model to set the context for your SharePoint site, getting a reference to the Stores_From_Azure external list, getting the items from the list, and then loading the items into an IQueryable set of list items (bcsListItems). You then use the FillStoreList method to populate List collection objects that will be used to display the data in the listbox and in the map:

    ...
    private void GetSPListData()
    {
    using (clientContext = new ClientContext("http://blueyonderdemo"))
    {
    web = clientContext.Web;
    clientContext.Load(web);
    var bcsListFromAzure = web.Lists.GetByTitle("Stores_From_Azure");
    CamlQuery query = new CamlQuery();
    IQueryable<ListItem> bcsListItems = bcsListFromAzure.GetItems(query);
    bcsStoreList = clientContext.LoadQuery(bcsListItems);
    clientContext.ExecuteQueryAsync(OnStoresRequestSucceeded,
    OnRequestFailed);
    }
    }
    ...
    private void FillStoreList()
    {
    storeDetailsList.Clear();

    foreach (var x in bcsStoreList)
    {
    StoreDetails objStoreDetails = new StoreDetails();
    objStoreDetails.StoreName =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(3).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreAddress =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(4).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StorePhone =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(5).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreHours =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(8).Value.ToString();
    objStoreDetails.StoreLocation = new Location(
    Convert.ToDouble(x.FieldValues.ElementAt(6).Value.ToString()),
    Convert.ToDouble(x.FieldValues.ElementAt(7).Value.ToString()));
    storeDetailsList.Add(objStoreDetails);

    StoreInfo objStoreSummary = new StoreInfo();
    objStoreSummary.StoreName =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(3).Value.ToString();
    objStoreSummary.StoreAddress =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(4).Value.ToString();
    objStoreSummary.StorePhone =
    x.FieldValues.ElementAt(5).Value.ToString();
    listOfStoreSummaries.Add(objStoreSummary);
    }
    lstStores.ItemsSource = listOfStoreSummaries;

    AddStoresToMap();
    }


    The map is the Bing functionality that you’ll use to create pushpins and overlay each of the store records (as pushpins) within. It’s a great way to create dynamic applications within SharePoint that require some level of geo-services—think sales territory, customer locations, and so on. For example, the following code snippet shows how you’re iterating through each of the items you’ve read from the external list and added to the storeDetailsList List collection, and then calling the CreatePushpin method to add a new pushpin for each of those records pulled from the external list. You set specific properties for the pushpin as it is added to the map. Note that you can also use String.Format to create the description string, as you can see in the following example:

    string description = String.Format("{0}", storeDetailsList[i].StoreName);

    The MouseEnter and MouseLeave events handle the displaying of the tooltip object:

    private void AddStoresToMap()
    {
    Pushpins.Children.Clear();

    for (int i = 0; i < storeDetailsList.Count; i++)
    {
    string description = "Store: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreName
    + "\nAddress: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreAddress
    + "\nPhone: " + storeDetailsList[i].StorePhone
    + "\nHours: " + storeDetailsList[i].StoreHours;

    CreatePushpin(storeDetailsList[i].StoreLocation, description);
    }
    }

    private void CreatePushpin(Location location, string description)
    {
    Pushpin pushpin = new Pushpin();
    pushpin.Width = 7;
    pushpin.Height = 10;
    pushpin.Tag = description;
    pushpin.Location = location;
    Pushpins.AddChild(pushpin, location, PositionOrigin.Center);

    pushpin.MouseEnter += new MouseEventHandler(Shape_MouseEnter);
    pushpin.MouseLeave += new MouseEventHandler(Shape_MouseLeave);
    }

    The last piece is the zooming of the store in the map after you click a specific record and click the Zoom button. The btnZoomOnStore_Click event triggers the re-centering of the map to focus on the store you clicked in the listbox. For example, the following code snippet shows that when you do this, you’re creating a new Location object (an object specifically required by the Bing Map) and a new StoreInfo object. Because you data-bound the listbox to the in-memory custom class (that is, StoreInfo), you can cast the selected item in the listbox as a StoreInfo object and then query it using a simple LINQ statement. This gives one result you can then use to zoom in on by calling the SetView method—another member of the Bing Maps API:
    private void btnZoomOnStore_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
    Location locationFilter = new Location();
    StoreInfo tempStoreRecord = new StoreInfo();

    tempStoreRecord = (StoreInfo)lstStores.SelectedItem;
    string storeNameFilter = tempStoreRecord.StoreName;

    var locationData = from store in storeDetailsList
    where store.StoreName == storeNameFilter
    select store;

    foreach (var item in locationData)
    {
    locationFilter = item.StoreLocation;
    }

    MainMap.SetView(locationFilter, 10);
    }

    Now that you understand the code, let’s jump back into the Visual Studio project.

  10. You’re now ready to deploy the Silverlight application to SharePoint. To do this, navigate to your SharePoint site, add the XAP file to a document library, and copy the shortcut of the newly added XAP file by right-clicking the file and selecting Copy Shortcut, as shown in the following image.



  11. Navigate to (or create) a SharePoint webpage, and select Site Actions and Edit Page. Click the Insert tab, select Web Part, and select the Media And Content Web Part group. Click the Silverlight Web Part, and click Add.

  12. Paste the shortcut to the XAP file in the URL field in the Silverlight Web Part dialog box, and click OK.

When you’ve added the Silverlight Web Part, the page load will trigger the MainPage_Loaded event, which will use the client object model to load the SQL Azure data from the external list and create pushpins (using the Bing Maps API) and add to the Silverlight-based Bing Map. The application will also load a subset of the data from the external list and data-bind it to an internal custom object. In Figure 1, you can see that the listbox on the left side of the Silverlight application has each of the stores from SQL Azure loaded into the listbox control, and on the right, each of the pushpins has been loaded as well. Also note that when you move the pointer over a pushpin, you’ll get additional metadata about the store.

Figure 1. Loading the SQL Azure data from an external list into a Bing Map.


When you select one of the records in the listbox and then click the Zoom button, this will reposition the store from the listbox at the center of the Bing Map, as shown in Figure 2—where the Contoso Bellevue Store has been selected from the listbox and now is centered in the map.

Figure 2. Repositioned store in the map.


This application was more complex than the first two exercises; however, it shows that there are some interesting applications that can be built from integrating Windows Azure and SharePoint. Furthermore, when you add Bing Maps functionality, there is an additional dynamic element that can also be integrated within your application.

Other -----------------
- Storing and Sharing Files and Other Online Content : Exploring Online Bookmarking Services
- Storing and Sharing Files and Other Online Content : Understanding Cloud Storage & Evaluating Online File-Storage and -Sharing Services
- Integrating the SharePoint Server Object Model and the Entity Data Model (part 2) - Create a Meeting Scheduler Visual Web Part
- Integrating the SharePoint Server Object Model and the Entity Data Model (part 1) - Create a Console Application to Write Data to a SharePoint List
- Collaborating on Presentations : Evaluating Web-Based Presentation Applications (part 2)
- Collaborating on Presentations : Evaluating Web-Based Presentation Applications (part 1)
- Securing the Connection to SQL Azure (part 3) - Surface SQL Azure Data in a Visual Web Part
- Securing the Connection to SQL Azure (part 2) - Set Permissions for an External Content Type
- Securing the Connection to SQL Azure (part 1) - Create an Application ID & Create an External Content Type
- Consuming SQL Azure Data : Integrating SQL Azure with BCS by Using SharePoint Designer 2010
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
programming4us
Natural Miscarriage
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer