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Windows Server 2003 : Configuring Remote Access Connections (part 1) - Using Remote Access Client Addressing

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Using Dial-Up Networking

Remote access typically occurs through either a dial-up or a VPN connection. In this lesson, the steps necessary to configure remote access addressing and authentication are presented in the context of dial-up networking. Figure 1 illustrates this type of scenario.

Figure 1. Dial-up networking scenario


In the scenario, the dial-up client is configured to connect through the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) to a Windows Server 2003 computer running Routing And Remote Access. This connection is typically established over a public switched telephone network (PSTN) telephone line, but it can also be established over an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) or X.25 network.

The remote access server, also called the network access server (NAS), answers each simultaneous call from dial-up clients by means of a separate modem. You can install these modems in a modem bank, as shown in Figure 10-1, or you can install them in the remote access server itself.

Dial-up access requires configuration both at the client and at the server. On the client side, you must configure a dial-up connection to the remote access server through the New Connection Wizard. To configure remote access on the server side, you can use either the Routing And Remote Access Server Setup Wizard or the server properties dialog box in the Routing And Remote Access console.

Note

The Routing And Remote Access Server Setup Wizard is available only when Routing And Remote Access has not yet been configured on your server. To open the Routing And Remote Access Server Setup Wizard, right-click the server icon in the Routing And Remote Access console and then click Configure And Enable Routing And Remote Access.


Using Remote Access Client Addressing

Each remote computer that connects to a remote access server is automatically provided with an Internet Protocol (IP) address during the PPP connection establishment process. The remote access server obtains the IP addresses allocated to remote access clients either from an existing DHCP server or from a static range of IP addresses.

You control how IP addresses are allocated in one of two places: the IP Address Assignment page of the Routing And Remote Access Server Setup Wizard, as shown in Figure 2, or the IP Address Assignment area of the server’s IP properties in Routing And Remote Access, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 2. Configuring address assignment in the Routing And Remote Access Server Setup Wizard


Figure 3. Configuring address assignment in server properties

DHCP

If DHCP is already deployed on your network, you should configure the remote access server to distribute addresses through the existing DHCP server. If the DHCP server does not lie within broadcast range of the remote access server, you must configure a DHCP relay agent on the remote access server, or on the same network segment as the remote access server.

When configured to obtain addresses for distribution from a DHCP server, the remote access server obtains a block of 10 addresses upon startup. The remote access server then uses the first of these addresses for itself and assigns subsequent addresses to TCP/ IP-based remote access clients as they connect. When more than 10 IP addresses are needed at any given time, the remote access server obtains more blocks of 10 addresses as needed. If a DHCP server is not available when Routing And Remote Access is started, the remote access client instead assigns itself an address within the Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) range from 169.254.0.1 through 169.254.255.254. This range normally does not allow connectivity to the remote access network.

Tip

For the exam, you need to be familiar with the way Routing And Remote Access obtains and distributes IP addresses. Know also that remote access malfunctions if Routing And Remote Access is unable to acquire 10 free leases from a DHCP server. A common sign of this malfunctioning is the presence of an APIPA address on the remote access client. Finally, remember that an APIPA address might also be a sign that you need to configure a DHCP server or DHCP relay agent on the remote access server’s network segment.


Static Address Pool

When no DHCP server has been deployed on your network, you can configure the remote access server to assign addresses through a static address pool, as shown in Figure 4. Typically, the address pool is defined as a range that is logically connected but non-overlapping with the range of addresses beyond the remote access server. For example, if the internal address of the remote access server is 192.168.1.1/24, you could safely define your address pool as a section of the 192.168.1.0/24 range that does not include any addresses assigned to computers on the internal network.

Figure 4. Configuring an address pool for remote access clients


If you define the static IP address pool as a distinct subnet (or set of subnets) logically separate from the subnets to which the remote access server is directly connected, you must configure the routers on your network with information about the new subnet. This configuration is identical to the configuration you would perform if you added a logical subnet to the remote access server’s physical network segment. Specifically, the routers on your network must forward packets destined for the remote clients to the remote access server’s network segment.

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