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Configuring and Troubleshooting IPv6 in Windows Vista (part 3) - Configuring IPv6 in Windows Vista Using Netsh , Other IPv6 Configuration Tasks

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11/15/2014 3:15:10 AM

Configuring IPv6 in Windows Vista Using Netsh

To configure the IPv6 settings for a network connection in Windows Vista using the netsh.exe command, open a command prompt window with local administrator credentials and type the appropriate netsh.exe command from the netsh interface ipv6 context. Some examples of IPv6 configuration tasks that can be performed from this context include:

  • To add the unicast IPv6 address 2001:DB8::8:800:20C4:0 to the interface named Local Area Connection as a persistent IPv6 address with infinite valid and preferred lifetimes, type the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 add address “Local Area Connection” 2001:DB8::8:800:20C4:0

  • To configure a default gateway with unicast IPv6 address 2001:DB8:0:2F3B:2AA:FF:FE28:9C5A for the interface named Local Area Connection, add a default route with this address specified as a next-hop address by typing the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 add route ::/0 “Local Area Connection” 2001:DB8:0:2F3B:2AA:FF:FE28:9C5A

  • To configure a DNS server with unicast IPv6 address 2001:DB8:0:1::1 as the second (alternate) DNS server on the list of DNS servers for the interface named Local Area Connection, type the following command:

    netsh interface ipv6 add dnsserver “Local Area Connection” 2001:DB8:0:1::1 index=2

For more information on using the netsh interface ipv6 context, type netsh interface ipv6 /? at a command prompt.

Other IPv6 Configuration Tasks

The following section describes some additional IPv6 configuration tasks that network administrators may need to know how to perform with Windows Vista computers.

Enabling or Disabling IPv6

You cannot uninstall IPv6 in Windows Vista, but you can disable IPv6 on a per-connection basis. To do this, follow these steps:

1.
Open the Network And Sharing Center in Control Panel.

2.
Click Manage Network Connections, and then double-click the connection you want to configure.

3.
Clear the checkbox labeled Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6), and then click OK (see Figure 2).

Figure 2. Disabling IPv6 for a network connection.


If you disable IPv6 on all your network connections using the user interface method as described in the preceding steps, IPv6 still remains enabled on all tunnel interfaces and on the loopback interface.

As an alternative to using the user interface to disable IPv6 on a per-connection basis, you can selectively disable certain features of IPv6 by creating and configuring the following DWORD registry value:

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\tcpip6\Parameters\DisabledComponents

Table 1 describes the flag values that control each IPv6 feature. By combining these flag values together into a bitmask, you can disable more than one feature at once. (By default, DisabledComponents has the value 0.)

Table 1. Bitmask Values for Disabling IPv6 Features in Windows Vista
Flag low-order bitResult of setting this bit to a value of 1
0Disables all IPv6 tunnel interfaces, including ISATAP, 6to4, and Teredo tunnels
1Disables all 6to4-based interfaces
2Disables all ISATAP-based interfaces
3Disables all Teredo-based interfaces
4Disables IPv6 over all non-tunnel interfaces, including LAN and Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) interfaces
5Modifies the default prefix policy table to prefer IPv4 over IPv6 when attempting connections.


For example, by setting the value of DisabledComponents to 0xFF, you can simultaneously disable IPv6 on all your network connections and tunnel interfaces. If you do this, IPv6 still remains enabled on the loopback interface, however.

Note


Disabling Random Interface IDs

You can disable the default behavior of generating random interface IDs for non-temporary autoconfigured public addresses (global addresses registered in DNS) and link-local addresses by using the following command:

netsh interface ipv6 set global randomizeidentifiers=disabled

To re-enable the generating of random interface IDs, use the following command:

netsh interface ipv6 set global randomizeidentifiers=enabled

Note

Disabling random interface IDs causes link-local addresses to revert to using 48-bit MAC-layer (or 64-bit EUI) addresses for generating the interface ID portion of the address. In Windows, this happens immediately and does not require a reboot.


Resetting IPv6 Configuration

To remove all user-configured IPv6 settings and restore the IPv6 configuration of a computer to its default state, type the following command:

netsh interface ipv6 reset

You must reboot the computer for this command to take effect.

Displaying Teredo Client Status

To verify the current state of the Teredo client on your computer, open a command prompt window using local administrator credentials, and then type the following command:

netsh interface teredo show state

For a Windows Vista computer on which Teredo is currently inactive, the typical output for this command looks like this:

Teredo Parameters
---------------------------------------------
Type : default
Server Name : teredo.ipv6.microsoft.com.
Client Refresh Interval : 30 seconds
Client Port : unspecified
State : dormant
Client Type : teredo client
Network : managed
NAT : none (global connectivity)

Note


If your command output doesn’t contain all of the preceding information, you probably started your command prompt session using standard credentials instead of administrator credentials.


If you now start an IPv6-enabled application that uses Teredo, such as Windows Meeting Space or Windows Remote Assistance, and then type the same Netsh command, the command output typically now looks like this:

Teredo Parameters
---------------------------------------------
Type : default
Server Name : teredo.ipv6.microsoft.com.
Client Refresh Interval : 30 seconds
Client Port : unspecified
State : qualified
Client Type : teredo client
Network : managed
NAT : restricted

Comparing these two command outputs shows that starting an application that uses Teredo changes the Teredo client state from dormant (inactive) to qualified (active).

Note

The output of the netsh interface teredo show state command also tells you the type of NAT your computer is behind (if any). In the preceding example, the computer is behind a restricted NAT. Teredo works well behind restricted and cone NATs, but not behind symmetric NATs. If you plan to purchase a SOHO router for broadband Internet connectivity, the best choice is a router that supports 6to4.

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