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Troubleshooting Stop Messages : Memory Dump Files (part 2) - Using Memory Dump Files to Analyze Stop Errors - Using Problem Reports And Solutions

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12/30/2014 3:23:28 AM

How to Manually Initiate a Stop Error and Create a Dump File

To be absolutely certain that a dump file will be created when a Stop error occurs, you can manually initiate a Stop error by creating a registry value and pressing a special sequence of characters. After Windows Vista restarts, you can verify that the dump file was correctly created.

To manually initiate a crash dump, follow these steps:

1.
Click Start and type Regedit. On the Start menu, right-click Regedit and click Run As Administrator. Respond to the UAC prompt that appears.

2.
In the registry editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ CurrentControlSet\Services\i8042prt\Parameters.

3.
On the Edit menu, click New | DWORD (32-bit) Value, and then add the following registry value:

  • Value Name: CrashOnCtrlScroll

  • Value: 1

4.
Close the registry editor, and then restart the computer.

5.
Log on to Windows Vista. While holding down the right Ctrl key, press the Scroll Lock key twice to initiate a Stop error.

You cannot manually initiate a Stop error in a virtual machine that has virtual machine extensions installed.

Using Memory Dump Files to Analyze Stop Errors

Memory dump files record detailed information about the state of your operating system when the Stop error occurred. You can analyze memory dump files manually by using debugging tools or by using automated processes provided by Microsoft. The information you obtain can help you understand more about the root cause of the problem.

You can use Problem Reports And Solutions to upload your memory dump file information to Microsoft. You can also use the following debugging tools to manually analyze your memory dump files:

  • Microsoft Kernel Debugger (Kd.exe)

  • Microsoft WinDbg Debugger (WinDbg.exe)

You can view information about the Setop error in the System log after a Stop error occurs. For example, the following information event (with a source of BugCheck and an Event ID of 1001) indicates a 0xFE Stop error occurred:

The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck.  The bugcheck was: 0x000000fe (0x00000008, 0x00000006, 0x00000001, 0x87b1e000).
 A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP.

Using Problem Reports And Solutions

When enabled, the Windows Error Reporting Service monitors your operating system for faults related to operating system components and applications. By using the Windows Error Reporting Service, you can obtain more information about the problem or condition that caused the Stop error.

When a Stop error occurs, Windows Vista displays a Stop message and writes diagnostic information to the memory dump file. For reporting purposes, the operating system also saves a small memory dump file. The next time you start your system and log on to Windows Vista as an Administrator, Problem Reports And Solutions gathers information about the problem and performs the following actions:

1.
Windows Vista displays the Windows Has Recovered From An Unexpected Shutdown dialog box, as shown in Figure 2. To view the Stop error code, operating system information, and dump file locations, click View Problem Details. Click Check For Solution to submit the mini dump file information and possibly several other temporary files to Microsoft.

Figure 2. Windows Vista prompts you to check for a solution after recovering from a Stop error.


2.
You might be prompted to collect additional information for future errors. If prompted, click Enable Collection, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3. Windows Vista might prompt you to collect additional information for future error reports.


3.
You might also be prompted to enable diagnostics. If prompted, click Turn On Diagnostics, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. Windows Vista might prompt you to enable diagnostics to gather more troubleshooting information.


4.
If prompted to send additional details, click View Details to review the additional information being sent. Then, click Send Information.

5.
If prompted to automatically send more information about future problems, choose Yes or No.

6.
When a possible solution is available, Problems Reports And Solutions displays an icon in the system tray with a notification message, as shown in Figure 5.

Figure 5. Problem Reports And Solutions can automatically notify you when a solution is available.


7.
Click the icon in the system tray to view the solution. Alternatively, you can manually open Problem Reports And Solutions by clicking Start, pointing to All Programs, pointing to Maintenance, and then clicking Problem Reports And Solutions. When you have reviewed the solution, as shown in Figure 6, click OK.

Figure 6. Problem Reports And Solutions provides a summary of a Stop error.

If Problem Reports And Solutions does not identify the source of an error, you might be able to determine that a specific driver caused the error by using a debugger, as described in the next section.

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