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Windows XP

Administering Your Network - Connecting to a Remote Registry & Connecting to Remote Group Policies

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3/14/2011 9:17:58 AM
If you’re the administrator of your network fiefdom, setting up the machines on the network is only half the battle. You’ll still need to spend untold amounts of time tweaking these machines, adjusting their configurations, creating and managing users and passwords, and so on. To make these chores easier, Windows XP boasts various tools that offer you remote administration: the ability to work with a network computer from the comfort of your own system. This section shows you how to implement these tools on your network.

Windows XP’s remote administration tools are powerful features that can make a harried network administrator’s life immeasurably easier. Here’s a summary of just a few of capabilities you get when you use remote administration:

  • Work directly with the Registry on any remote computer

  • Monitor the performance of a remote system

  • See which users are connected to a particular resource

  • Manage various aspects of a remote computer (such as starting and stopping services)

  • Send console message to a remote computer

To help you unleash all of these benefits, the next few sections take you through various techniques for remote administration.

Connecting to a Remote Registry

The Registry Editor enables you to work with some portions of the Registry on a remote machine. First, log on as a member of the Administrators group on both machines. On the remote machine, you need to do two things:

  1. Disable Simple File Sharing. To do this, launch Control Panel’s Folder Options icon, display the View tab, and then deactivate the Use Simple File Sharing check box.

  2. Enable remote access. To do this, launch Control Panel’s System icon, display the Remote tab, and activate the Allow Users to Connect Remotely to this Computer check box.

On the local computer, follow these steps:

1.
In the Registry Editor, select the File, Connect Network Registry command. The Select Computer dialog box appears.

2.
In the Enter the Object Name to Select text box, type the name of the remote computer.

Tip

If you’re not sure of the correct name for the remote computer, click Advanced and then click Find Now to see a list of the workgroup computers. Select the remote computer and then click OK.

3.
Click OK. The Registry Editor adds a new branch for the remote machine’s registry, although you see only the HKLM and HKU root keys, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. When you connect to a remote registry, the computer’s HKLM and HKU root keys appear in the Registry Editor.

When you’ve finished working with the remote Registry, select the computer name in the Registry Editor, select File, Disconnect Network Registry, select the computer name, and click OK.

Connecting to Remote Group Policies

You’ve seen in various places in this book how powerful group policies can be, particularly when you use the Group Policy editor—it has a front end for enabling, disabling, and configuring policies. How much more convenient would group policies be if you could work with them on a remote network machine?

The good news is that you can do this by running the gpedit.msc file with the /gpcomputer switch:

gpedit.msc /gpcomputer:"name"

/gpcomputer:"name"The network name or IP address of the remote computer

For example, the following command runs the Group Policy editor for the policies on a computer named APOLLO:

gpedit.msc /gpcomputer:"apollo"

The bad news is that Windows XP seems to allow the remote management of group policies only from the Administrator account. If you normally log on using a different account, create a shortcut for the gpedit.msc /gpcomputer command. Then right-click the shortcut and click Run As to display the Run As dialog box. Activate the Following User option, and specify the Administrator account and password.

Tip

If Windows XP fails to open the remote computer’s group policies when you use the computer’s name with the /pgcomputer switch, try using the computer’s IP address instead.

Other -----------------
- Sharing Resources with the Network
- Accessing Network Resources - Mapping a Network Folder to a Local Drive Letter
- Accessing Network Resources - Adding a Network Place
- Accessing Network Resources - Using My Network Places
- Setting Up a Peer-to-Peer Network : Working with Network Settings
- Setting Up a Peer-to-Peer Network : Implementing Wireless Network Security
- Setting Up a Peer-to-Peer Network : Configuring a Wireless Gateway
- Setting Up a Peer-to-Peer Network : Running the Network Setup Wizard
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