Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
programming4us
Windows 7

Visual Basic 2010 : Objects Serialization (part 1) - Binary Serialization

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
6/12/2011 4:26:59 PM
Serializing .NET objects is the easiest serialization mode. In this particular scenario you need a file stream where you have to place data and a formatter establishing the serialization mode. When you have the formatter instance, you simply invoke the Serialize method. The System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters namespace provides two sub namespaces, Binary and Soap, exposing respectively the following formatters: BinaryFormatter and SoapFormatter. The first one serializes objects in a binary way. It is efficient but you should use it only if you are sure that your objects will be deserialized by .NET applications, because such binary format is not universal. If you instead want to be sure that your objects can be shared across different applications and platforms, you should prefer the SoapFormatter that produces an Xml-based result useful when working with Soap web services.

Binary Serialization

The following example shows how you can serialize a typed collection of strings into a file on disk using the BinaryFormatter class:

Dim stringSeries As New List(Of String) From
{"Serialization", "demo",
"with VB"}

Dim targetFile As New _
FileStream("C:\temp\SerializedData.dat",
FileMode.Create)
Dim formatter As New BinaryFormatter

formatter.Serialize(targetFile, stringSeries)
targetFile.Close()
formatter = Nothing

Note

The above code example requires Imports System.IO and Imports System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary directives.


The code simply creates a new file named SerializedData.Dat and puts the result of the binary serialization in the file. If you examine the content of the file with the Windows Notepad, you can obtain a result similar to what is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Examining the result of the serialization process.

You don’t effectively need to know how your objects are serialized, but it is interesting to understand what kind of information is placed into the target file, such as the serialized type, assembly information, and the actual data. To deserialize a binary file you simply invoke the BinaryFormatter.Deserialize method, as shown in the following code which you write right after the preceding example:

Dim sourceFile As New FileStream("C:\temp\SerializedData.dat",
FileMode.Open)

formatter = New BinaryFormatter
Dim data = CType(formatter.Deserialize(sourceFile),
List(Of String))

sourceFile.Close()
formatter = Nothing

'Iterates the result
For Each item In data
Console.WriteLine(item)
Next

Notice that Deserialize returns Object; therefore, the result needs to be converted into the appropriate type that you expect. If you run the preceding code you see on your screen how the strings from the collection are correctly listed. This kind of serialization is also straightforward because it enables serializing entire object graphs. Moreover, you can use this technique against user interface controls in Windows Forms and WPF applications to persist the state of your interface objects that can be later re-created.

Handling Serialization Exceptions

Remember to perform serialization and deserialization operations within a Try..Catch block and implement code for handling the SerializationException exception that provides information on serialization/deserialization errors.


Creating Objects Deep Copies with Serialization

The code in Listing 1 shows how to accomplish this by implementing a generic method.

Listing 1. Implementing Deep Copy with Serialization
Imports System.Runtime.Serialization
Imports System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary
Imports System.IO

Public Class CreateDeepCopy

Public Shared Function Clone(Of T)(ByVal objectToClone As T) As T

'If the source object is null, simply returns the current
'object (as a default)
If Object.ReferenceEquals(objectToClone, Nothing) Then
Return objectToClone
End If

'Creates a new formatter whose behavior is for cloning purposes
Dim formatter As New BinaryFormatter(Nothing,
New StreamingContext(
StreamingContextStates.Clone))
'Serializes to a memory stream
Dim ms As New MemoryStream
Using ms
formatter.Serialize(ms, objectToClone)

'Gets back to the first stream byte
ms.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin)
'Deserializes the object graph to a new T object
Return CType(formatter.Deserialize(ms), T)
End Using
End Function
End Class


Because you are not limited to file streams, taking advantage of a memory stream is good in such a scenario. You invoke the preceding method as follows:

Dim result As Object = CreateDeepCopy.Clone(objectToClone)

You could also implement extension methods for providing deep copy to all types.

Other -----------------
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Editing a Chart & Moving and Resizing a Chart
- Microsoft Excel 2010 - Choosing the Right Type of Chart & Creating a Chart
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Working Together on Office Documents - Working with Folders on Windows Live
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Working Together on Office Documents - Accessing Documents on Windows Live
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Creating a New Diagram - Selecting Shapes
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Creating a New Diagram - Using Basic Shapes and the Dynamic Grid
- Managing Security in Windows 7 : Windows Firewall
- Managing Security in Windows 7 : Designing BitLocker Support
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Working Together on Office Documents - Comparing the Desktop App to Web App
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Working Together on Office Documents - Saving and Opening Documents with Windows Live
 
 
25 Inspiring Game of Thrones Quotes
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
 
programming4us
Natural Miscarriage
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Game Trailer