Logo
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
programming4us
Home
programming4us
XP
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server
programming4us
Windows Phone
 
programming4us
Windows 7

Using Application Deployment Tools : Deploying Applications Using RDS (part 1) - Deploying RemoteApp Applications

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
9/12/2013 3:03:33 AM

1. Overview of RDS Deployment

In its most basic form, RDS works by running applications on a Windows Server 2008 R2 server and enabling workstations to access those applications. The workstation runs a client application, which establishes a connection to the server, creating a session for that client’s exclusive use. The session can provide the client with a complete Windows desktop, including a full range of applications, a desktop dedicated to one application, or an application in an individual window.

An RDS server with a single copy of an application installed on it can provide multiple users with access to that application. The number of users is functionally limited by the hardware resources in the server. Each user has its own copy of the application, enabling it to function independently of the other users, but RDS uses special memory management techniques to avoid loading multiple copies of every application file for each user.

An RDS session consists of the following three basic components:

  • Remote Desktop Session Host. The core service running on the server, hosting individual applications and full desktops. Remote Desktop Session Host is a role service that is part of the Remote Desktop Services role on Windows Server 2008 R2 servers.

  • Remote Desktop Connection. The client program running on the workstation. Remote Desktop Connection is included with all of the current versions of Windows.

  • Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). The communications protocol that connects the Remote Desktop Connection client to the Remote Desktop Session Host service on the RDS server. RDP carries only interface traffic, such as keystrokes and mouse movements from client to server and display data from server to client.

Note

SERVICE RENAMED

Prior to Windows Server 2008 R2, Remote Desktop Services was known as Terminal Services, and the Remote Desktop Session Host role service was called Terminal Server. The technologies are essentially the same and are fully compatible. Only the names of the various server components have changed.

2. Understanding RDS Deployment Options

Some administrators use RDS as a complete client desktop solution. They install all of the applications their users need on the RDS server and, after the users connect with the Remote Desktop Connection client, they spend all of their time working in the RDS session. Supporting large numbers of users and users with different requirements can complicate this arrangement enormously, however.

Other administrators prefer to employ RDS as a partial solution, using it to provide only certain applications to clients. A standard RDS session can contain just a few applications, or even one, and clients can switch back and forth between local applications and those provided by RDS.

Combining two desktops on a single workstation can be confusing to some users, however. People who spend all their time in an RDS desktop might not even realize that they are connecting to a server for their applications. Having to switch from one desktop to another might be asking too much of them.

A feature called RemoteApp, introduced in Windows Server 2008, addresses this issue by delivering individual applications to clients in separate windows. There is no RDS desktop involved; the windows appear to the user just as they would if they were running the application locally. Users do not run the Remote Desktop Connection client to access RemoteApp applications; instead, they use a desktop icon provided by an administrator, or they click an icon on an intranet Web page.

Users can open multiple RemoteApp programs at the same time, and as long as all of the programs are hosted by the same RDS server, the applications all run in a single session. RemoteApp is therefore no less efficient than a full remote desktop, when it comes to the hardware resources it consumes on the RDS server.

3. Deploying RemoteApp Applications

Deploying a full RDS desktop is basically a matter of installing the Remote Desktop Services role on a Windows Server 2008 R2 computer with the Remote Desktop Session Host role service, and then installing the applications you want to share. When you grant users access to the RDS server, they can connect using the Remote Desktop Connection client and run the applications you installed.

Unless you are planning to deploy a full workstation application configuration using RDS, you are probably better off using RemoteApp to deploy individual applications. Deploying applications using RemoteApp involves the following tasks:

  • Add RemoteApp programs

  • Package RemoteApp applications

  • Access RemoteApp through the Web

To provide users with access to applications by using RemoteApp, you must install the applications in the normal manner, and then use the RemoteApp Manager console, as shown in Figure 1, to designate them as RemoteApp programs.

The RemoteApp Manager console

Figure 1. The RemoteApp Manager console

When you launch the RemoteApp Wizard, you can select any of the applications currently installed on the server. The Properties sheet for each application, as shown in Figure 2, enables you to modify the parameters that RDS uses to share the application. For example, you can add arguments to the command line that launches the application, enable users to supply their own command line arguments, and even change the name that appears with the application icon on your client computers.

The RemoteApp Properties sheet

Figure 2. The RemoteApp Properties sheet

When you complete the wizard, the application appears in the console in the RemoteApp Programs list.

Other -----------------
- Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Add a Signature
- Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Add a File Attachment
- Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Select a Contact Address
- Working with E-mail, Contacts, and Events : Create a Contact Category
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 4) - Extending the MDT Database with Custom Settings
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 3) - Filling the MDT Database Using PowerShell
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 2) - Using the MDT Database
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Working with the MDT Database (part 1) - Creating the MDT Database
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Creating a Linked Deployment Share (part 2) - Maintaining Linked Deployment Shares
- Fine-Tuning MDT Deployments : Creating a Linked Deployment Share (part 1) - Understanding Linked Deployment Shares
 
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
Popular tags
Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8
programming4us programming4us
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.
 
programming4us
Windows Vista
programming4us
Windows 7
programming4us
Windows Azure
programming4us
Windows Server